Could Southampton follow in the recent trend of rebranding its sports teams?

Hampshire Chronicle: Hampshire County Cricket Club has been rebranded to become the more streamlined Hampshire Cricket Hampshire County Cricket Club has been rebranded to become the more streamlined Hampshire Cricket

THE sporting landscape is changing in Birmingham, and it could be changing in other big cities like Bristol and Hull.

For thousands of fans, their club’s name is sacrosanct. It must never be tampered with.

But many are increasingly finding that is not the case.

Hull City owner Assem Allam has courted controversy all season with his plan to internationally market Southampton’s Premier League rivals as Hull Tigers.

This week the Football Association’s membership committee recommended that its governing council rejects Mr Allam’s request to change the name of the club.

Mr Allam has threatened to put the club up for sale and walk away if his plans are blocked – and many would not be sorry to see him go, despite the on-field success Hull City has achieved under his tenure.

However, he is far from a lone voice in our national sports.

Warwickshire County Cricket Club will be known, for the first time, as the Birmingham Bears in this summer’s t20 tournament.

Birmingham City Council asked the club to consider the name change, for the t20s only, and to the surprise of many it agreed.

And only this week, Gloucestershire County Cricket Club have gone public in asking whether the time has come to insert “Bristol” somewhere in their official name.

New chief executive Will Brown said: “There is a growing groundswell of opinion that maybe we should be looking to have Bristol in the name somewhere.

“Should we follow Warwickshire’s example where they have renamed the T20 team the Birmingham Bears? Should we be the Bristol Badgers or something for T20 cricket?”

Of course, sports club rebranding is nothing new in Southampton.

Hampshire became the first, and so far only, county to drop the three words “county cricket club” from their title back in the early 2000s.

Since then, they have been known as Hampshire Cricket.

In recent years, their official one-day name has been Hampshire Royals following a tie-up with the Indian Premier League club Rajasthan Royals.

As of this year, though, the county will play solely under the name “Hampshire” in all forms of the sport.

So what about the local football club? How would any plans to rename Southampton FC as Southampton Saints go down?

Comments (21)

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10:34am Sun 23 Mar 14

george chivers says...

The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues.

Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population.

The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English.

A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.
The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues. Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population. The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English. A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen. george chivers
  • Score: 11

10:41am Sun 23 Mar 14

Seedhouse the Unrepentant says...

'Southampton Saints go down' doesn't strike me as a particularly good name...
'Southampton Saints go down' doesn't strike me as a particularly good name... Seedhouse the Unrepentant
  • Score: 8

10:45am Sun 23 Mar 14

jezza says...

Seedhouse the Unrepentant wrote:
'Southampton Saints go down' doesn't strike me as a particularly good name...
I agree. I thought putting those words together was asking for trouble, however well intentioned it was meant to be.
[quote][p][bold]Seedhouse the Unrepentant[/bold] wrote: 'Southampton Saints go down' doesn't strike me as a particularly good name...[/p][/quote]I agree. I thought putting those words together was asking for trouble, however well intentioned it was meant to be. jezza
  • Score: 7

11:18am Sun 23 Mar 14

el caballo santos101 says...

george chivers wrote:
The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues.

Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population.

The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English.

A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.
whereas the three lions still live in England? and dragons still live in wales?
[quote][p][bold]george chivers[/bold] wrote: The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues. Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population. The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English. A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.[/p][/quote]whereas the three lions still live in England? and dragons still live in wales? el caballo santos101
  • Score: 0

11:18am Sun 23 Mar 14

Rising_Son says...

george chivers wrote:
The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues.

Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population.

The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English.

A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.
What has "the changing ethnic composition of our population" got to do with it? With the exception of the guy at Hull, I can't recall ever seeing ethnic minorities demanding a wholesale change of sports team names. Blaming Americanisation of the economy and marketing I can understand, but most of our ethnic minorities are less Americanised than our ethnic majority.

Do you also think we should stop referring the England team as the three "lions" or do you think we should introduce lions into the England's wild?
[quote][p][bold]george chivers[/bold] wrote: The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues. Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population. The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English. A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.[/p][/quote]What has "the changing ethnic composition of our population" got to do with it? With the exception of the guy at Hull, I can't recall ever seeing ethnic minorities demanding a wholesale change of sports team names. Blaming Americanisation of the economy and marketing I can understand, but most of our ethnic minorities are less Americanised than our ethnic majority. Do you also think we should stop referring the England team as the three "lions" or do you think we should introduce lions into the England's wild? Rising_Son
  • Score: -2

11:26am Sun 23 Mar 14

Mush On The Beach says...

There is certainly a challenge and fine balance to be managed between traditions and global marketing ventures. The Premiership has become an all-consuming story of successful capitalism, is our game still a sport or is it a business?
However, the biggest crime I’ve seen allowed to happen was the Football League granting the re-franchise of a football club from Wimbledon FC to MK Dons. That is one part of American sport/business culture that must never be allowed to happen again in Britain.
There is certainly a challenge and fine balance to be managed between traditions and global marketing ventures. The Premiership has become an all-consuming story of successful capitalism, is our game still a sport or is it a business? However, the biggest crime I’ve seen allowed to happen was the Football League granting the re-franchise of a football club from Wimbledon FC to MK Dons. That is one part of American sport/business culture that must never be allowed to happen again in Britain. Mush On The Beach
  • Score: 6

11:26am Sun 23 Mar 14

el caballo santos101 says...

the Portsmouth bottom dwellers? or
the poopey fishy few? or
the poopey debtors? or just
`the skunts`?
take your pick
the Portsmouth bottom dwellers? or the poopey fishy few? or the poopey debtors? or just `the skunts`? take your pick el caballo santos101
  • Score: 7

11:38am Sun 23 Mar 14

Rising_Son says...

Mush On The Beach wrote:
There is certainly a challenge and fine balance to be managed between traditions and global marketing ventures. The Premiership has become an all-consuming story of successful capitalism, is our game still a sport or is it a business?
However, the biggest crime I’ve seen allowed to happen was the Football League granting the re-franchise of a football club from Wimbledon FC to MK Dons. That is one part of American sport/business culture that must never be allowed to happen again in Britain.
Wimbledon because didn't have their own ground or any help from local councils to get one. In fact, Wimbledon council was very much against them and didn't want to lower the tone of the area with a football team. Their supporters were let down not only by 'business' but also by their local politicians.
[quote][p][bold]Mush On The Beach[/bold] wrote: There is certainly a challenge and fine balance to be managed between traditions and global marketing ventures. The Premiership has become an all-consuming story of successful capitalism, is our game still a sport or is it a business? However, the biggest crime I’ve seen allowed to happen was the Football League granting the re-franchise of a football club from Wimbledon FC to MK Dons. That is one part of American sport/business culture that must never be allowed to happen again in Britain.[/p][/quote]Wimbledon because didn't have their own ground or any help from local councils to get one. In fact, Wimbledon council was very much against them and didn't want to lower the tone of the area with a football team. Their supporters were let down not only by 'business' but also by their local politicians. Rising_Son
  • Score: 0

12:15pm Sun 23 Mar 14

justaSaintsfan says...

The first thing that springs to my mind is Swaythling Athletic changing its name to Eastleigh a while ago. Hardly an improvement, not that there is anything wrong with Eastleigh, of course. The residents of Chandlers Ford all live in the postal address Eastleigh, so that proud 'railway town' is a popular place to reside. I just think Swaythling Athletic sounds better, more like the name of a football club, with real football roots.

Saints would be unwise to change their name. Their roots go right back to the strong connections their founders had with St. Mary's Church and Saints are steeped in rich tradition and history. Ralph Krueger, Saints' new chairman has already stated that the club's history and tradition will be respected. Saints' name has long been very well known throughout the football world and beyond, so a name change would not make any commercial sense whatsoever. It is a far better idea to further grow the existing name into something much more high profile. What would be the point of starting from scratch with a new, unknown name, thus missing a great opportunity to capitalise more efficiently on a name that has already been growing for almost 130 years?

Hull City do not have the commercial advantage that Saints have. Perhaps the Hull City owner might have asked Hull fans for name suggestions. 'Tigers' does not really seem to fit Hull City.

Shame on you, Simon Carter, Daily Echo Sports Editor and writer of the article about which I'm commenting! Hampshire Cricket seem not to have shed as many as three words from their previous name. They dropped only 'County' and 'Club!'
The first thing that springs to my mind is Swaythling Athletic changing its name to Eastleigh a while ago. Hardly an improvement, not that there is anything wrong with Eastleigh, of course. The residents of Chandlers Ford all live in the postal address Eastleigh, so that proud 'railway town' is a popular place to reside. I just think Swaythling Athletic sounds better, more like the name of a football club, with real football roots. Saints would be unwise to change their name. Their roots go right back to the strong connections their founders had with St. Mary's Church and Saints are steeped in rich tradition and history. Ralph Krueger, Saints' new chairman has already stated that the club's history and tradition will be respected. Saints' name has long been very well known throughout the football world and beyond, so a name change would not make any commercial sense whatsoever. It is a far better idea to further grow the existing name into something much more high profile. What would be the point of starting from scratch with a new, unknown name, thus missing a great opportunity to capitalise more efficiently on a name that has already been growing for almost 130 years? Hull City do not have the commercial advantage that Saints have. Perhaps the Hull City owner might have asked Hull fans for name suggestions. 'Tigers' does not really seem to fit Hull City. Shame on you, Simon Carter, Daily Echo Sports Editor and writer of the article about which I'm commenting! Hampshire Cricket seem not to have shed as many as three words from their previous name. They dropped only 'County' and 'Club!' justaSaintsfan
  • Score: 1

12:41pm Sun 23 Mar 14

george chivers says...

Rising_Son wrote:
george chivers wrote:
The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues.

Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population.

The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English.

A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.
What has "the changing ethnic composition of our population" got to do with it? With the exception of the guy at Hull, I can't recall ever seeing ethnic minorities demanding a wholesale change of sports team names. Blaming Americanisation of the economy and marketing I can understand, but most of our ethnic minorities are less Americanised than our ethnic majority.

Do you also think we should stop referring the England team as the three "lions" or do you think we should introduce lions into the England's wild?
What I meant was the people who come to live in England from the EU and other countries tend to speak mostly American English rather English English because that is the way it is taught to them and what they pick up from the movies (Films).

The three lions is a logo not the name of a team or a club. It's origin, and I am guessing, is probably from the days of the empire and represents strength and power. But it is not used as part of the name, except of course in the British Lions when they play or go on tour. But that name is not used in domestic leagues. I am a traditionalist and prefer English names to American names in sports which have their origins in the U.K. I am quite happy for English ice hockey teams to have American names.
[quote][p][bold]Rising_Son[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]george chivers[/bold] wrote: The thing I object to is not so much the change of one name to another but the adoption of American English over UK English for sports teams that are playing games devised in England in English domestic leagues. Birmingham Bears, Hull Tigers. These names should be reserved for ice hockey teams or used in countries where bears and tigers live not in England where they don't. But it is of course inevitable this will happen because of the spread of American English on the back of American globalisation and the changing ethnic composition of our population. The success of the PL has priced British buyers for football clubs out of the market and more and more clubs will be bought by foreign billionaires who will want American style brands so they can address global markets with brands that connect with people who speak American English. A sad state of affairs. I'm opposed to it. But I know what is going to happen.[/p][/quote]What has "the changing ethnic composition of our population" got to do with it? With the exception of the guy at Hull, I can't recall ever seeing ethnic minorities demanding a wholesale change of sports team names. Blaming Americanisation of the economy and marketing I can understand, but most of our ethnic minorities are less Americanised than our ethnic majority. Do you also think we should stop referring the England team as the three "lions" or do you think we should introduce lions into the England's wild?[/p][/quote]What I meant was the people who come to live in England from the EU and other countries tend to speak mostly American English rather English English because that is the way it is taught to them and what they pick up from the movies (Films). The three lions is a logo not the name of a team or a club. It's origin, and I am guessing, is probably from the days of the empire and represents strength and power. But it is not used as part of the name, except of course in the British Lions when they play or go on tour. But that name is not used in domestic leagues. I am a traditionalist and prefer English names to American names in sports which have their origins in the U.K. I am quite happy for English ice hockey teams to have American names. george chivers
  • Score: 4

12:57pm Sun 23 Mar 14

george chivers says...

justaSaintsfan wrote:
The first thing that springs to my mind is Swaythling Athletic changing its name to Eastleigh a while ago. Hardly an improvement, not that there is anything wrong with Eastleigh, of course. The residents of Chandlers Ford all live in the postal address Eastleigh, so that proud 'railway town' is a popular place to reside. I just think Swaythling Athletic sounds better, more like the name of a football club, with real football roots.

Saints would be unwise to change their name. Their roots go right back to the strong connections their founders had with St. Mary's Church and Saints are steeped in rich tradition and history. Ralph Krueger, Saints' new chairman has already stated that the club's history and tradition will be respected. Saints' name has long been very well known throughout the football world and beyond, so a name change would not make any commercial sense whatsoever. It is a far better idea to further grow the existing name into something much more high profile. What would be the point of starting from scratch with a new, unknown name, thus missing a great opportunity to capitalise more efficiently on a name that has already been growing for almost 130 years?

Hull City do not have the commercial advantage that Saints have. Perhaps the Hull City owner might have asked Hull fans for name suggestions. 'Tigers' does not really seem to fit Hull City.

Shame on you, Simon Carter, Daily Echo Sports Editor and writer of the article about which I'm commenting! Hampshire Cricket seem not to have shed as many as three words from their previous name. They dropped only 'County' and 'Club!'
My father used to manage a team in the Hampshire League called Thornycroft Athletic (now defunct) and I saw many games between the two clubs when I was kid. Swaythling Athletic v Thornycroft Athletic on the front of a one page fold over programme, or vice versa, how can you get anything more English/British than that? Brilliant.

Hope we win today. COYR STID. Spurs 1 Saints 2
[quote][p][bold]justaSaintsfan[/bold] wrote: The first thing that springs to my mind is Swaythling Athletic changing its name to Eastleigh a while ago. Hardly an improvement, not that there is anything wrong with Eastleigh, of course. The residents of Chandlers Ford all live in the postal address Eastleigh, so that proud 'railway town' is a popular place to reside. I just think Swaythling Athletic sounds better, more like the name of a football club, with real football roots. Saints would be unwise to change their name. Their roots go right back to the strong connections their founders had with St. Mary's Church and Saints are steeped in rich tradition and history. Ralph Krueger, Saints' new chairman has already stated that the club's history and tradition will be respected. Saints' name has long been very well known throughout the football world and beyond, so a name change would not make any commercial sense whatsoever. It is a far better idea to further grow the existing name into something much more high profile. What would be the point of starting from scratch with a new, unknown name, thus missing a great opportunity to capitalise more efficiently on a name that has already been growing for almost 130 years? Hull City do not have the commercial advantage that Saints have. Perhaps the Hull City owner might have asked Hull fans for name suggestions. 'Tigers' does not really seem to fit Hull City. Shame on you, Simon Carter, Daily Echo Sports Editor and writer of the article about which I'm commenting! Hampshire Cricket seem not to have shed as many as three words from their previous name. They dropped only 'County' and 'Club!'[/p][/quote]My father used to manage a team in the Hampshire League called Thornycroft Athletic (now defunct) and I saw many games between the two clubs when I was kid. Swaythling Athletic v Thornycroft Athletic on the front of a one page fold over programme, or vice versa, how can you get anything more English/British than that? Brilliant. Hope we win today. COYR STID. Spurs 1 Saints 2 george chivers
  • Score: 0

2:40pm Sun 23 Mar 14

Bagamn says...

If you peruse the Clubs and their players in the English Leagues, try and find a team with all English names. When you listen to a commentary on the radio, it sounds the United Nations are having a kickabout. Wouldn't it be nice to have our own game back with a leather football and proper football boots.. Having a Manager that can't speak English is just a littler bit much.
If you peruse the Clubs and their players in the English Leagues, try and find a team with all English names. When you listen to a commentary on the radio, it sounds the United Nations are having a kickabout. Wouldn't it be nice to have our own game back with a leather football and proper football boots.. Having a Manager that can't speak English is just a littler bit much. Bagamn
  • Score: -2

2:51pm Sun 23 Mar 14

wakeupbrits says...

Sorry George your wrong.
The Bears being named as such has nothing to do with another country.
The Warwickshire Bear and ragged Staff is a heraldic sign, normally referring to Richard Nevil, Earl of Warwick (1428 – 71), known as the king maker. In Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part Two, Act 5, scene 1, where there is much talk of bear baiting.
I have known Warwickshire as The Bears since i started watching them in the sixties, its nothing new.
justaSaintsfan & George: The same goes for Hull City AFC who for decades have had the nickname of The Tigers.
I can agrre on outsiders who want to change history to suit their own agenda just because they are rich and buy a club.
Trouble is they may own the club in terms of the shares, but they will never own it's soul or traditions and one day they will be gone and it will still be the fans who have the last say.
Wrexham fans forced their owner out when he wanted to build houses on the ground, Wimbledon fans started again after they were shafted by the FA and Football League, Coventry fans refuse to travel to Northampton for matches and Birmingham fans are boycotting over a jailed owner who passed the Football League and FA Premier League 'Fit and Proper Person' test when he already had a conviction in the Far East and has bought the club with laundered money.
Sorry George your wrong. The Bears being named as such has nothing to do with another country. The Warwickshire Bear and ragged Staff is a heraldic sign, normally referring to Richard Nevil, Earl of Warwick (1428 – 71), known as the king maker. In Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part Two, Act 5, scene 1, where there is much talk of bear baiting. I have known Warwickshire as The Bears since i started watching them in the sixties, its nothing new. justaSaintsfan & George: The same goes for Hull City AFC who for decades have had the nickname of The Tigers. I can agrre on outsiders who want to change history to suit their own agenda just because they are rich and buy a club. Trouble is they may own the club in terms of the shares, but they will never own it's soul or traditions and one day they will be gone and it will still be the fans who have the last say. Wrexham fans forced their owner out when he wanted to build houses on the ground, Wimbledon fans started again after they were shafted by the FA and Football League, Coventry fans refuse to travel to Northampton for matches and Birmingham fans are boycotting over a jailed owner who passed the Football League and FA Premier League 'Fit and Proper Person' test when he already had a conviction in the Far East and has bought the club with laundered money. wakeupbrits
  • Score: 0

3:54pm Sun 23 Mar 14

Cincinnati says...

We are already the Southampton Saints. We are the most well known Saints in all of football. Many just refer to the team now as the Saints. What should never ever be tampered will is the red and white striped shirt. Hopefully that will return one day.
We are already the Southampton Saints. We are the most well known Saints in all of football. Many just refer to the team now as the Saints. What should never ever be tampered will is the red and white striped shirt. Hopefully that will return one day. Cincinnati
  • Score: 1

4:26pm Sun 23 Mar 14

JohnItaly says...

Cincinnati wrote:
We are already the Southampton Saints. We are the most well known Saints in all of football. Many just refer to the team now as the Saints. What should never ever be tampered will is the red and white striped shirt. Hopefully that will return one day.
Trouble is after today's game v. Spurs Southampton Sinners might be more appropriate!
[quote][p][bold]Cincinnati[/bold] wrote: We are already the Southampton Saints. We are the most well known Saints in all of football. Many just refer to the team now as the Saints. What should never ever be tampered will is the red and white striped shirt. Hopefully that will return one day.[/p][/quote]Trouble is after today's game v. Spurs Southampton Sinners might be more appropriate! JohnItaly
  • Score: 0

6:50am Mon 24 Mar 14

justaSaintsfan says...

george chivers wrote:
justaSaintsfan wrote:
The first thing that springs to my mind is Swaythling Athletic changing its name to Eastleigh a while ago. Hardly an improvement, not that there is anything wrong with Eastleigh, of course. The residents of Chandlers Ford all live in the postal address Eastleigh, so that proud 'railway town' is a popular place to reside. I just think Swaythling Athletic sounds better, more like the name of a football club, with real football roots.

Saints would be unwise to change their name. Their roots go right back to the strong connections their founders had with St. Mary's Church and Saints are steeped in rich tradition and history. Ralph Krueger, Saints' new chairman has already stated that the club's history and tradition will be respected. Saints' name has long been very well known throughout the football world and beyond, so a name change would not make any commercial sense whatsoever. It is a far better idea to further grow the existing name into something much more high profile. What would be the point of starting from scratch with a new, unknown name, thus missing a great opportunity to capitalise more efficiently on a name that has already been growing for almost 130 years?

Hull City do not have the commercial advantage that Saints have. Perhaps the Hull City owner might have asked Hull fans for name suggestions. 'Tigers' does not really seem to fit Hull City.

Shame on you, Simon Carter, Daily Echo Sports Editor and writer of the article about which I'm commenting! Hampshire Cricket seem not to have shed as many as three words from their previous name. They dropped only 'County' and 'Club!'
My father used to manage a team in the Hampshire League called Thornycroft Athletic (now defunct) and I saw many games between the two clubs when I was kid. Swaythling Athletic v Thornycroft Athletic on the front of a one page fold over programme, or vice versa, how can you get anything more English/British than that? Brilliant.

Hope we win today. COYR STID. Spurs 1 Saints 2
I couldn't agree more! One of my uncles played for Swaythling Athletic and I, too, watched such games as a youngster. I remember the old fold over programmes.

The names of so many of our football clubs in the UK just sound typically British, some of them uniquely so. Accrington Stanley is one such name, which was almost lost forever years ago.

I believe the sporting world is devalued when some football club owners change the name of their club. Hull City's owner seems not to have any grasp of the idea that it might actually be better commercially to retain his club's unusually short name and simply concentrate on growing the existing brand. I think he is missing an opportunity!
[quote][p][bold]george chivers[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]justaSaintsfan[/bold] wrote: The first thing that springs to my mind is Swaythling Athletic changing its name to Eastleigh a while ago. Hardly an improvement, not that there is anything wrong with Eastleigh, of course. The residents of Chandlers Ford all live in the postal address Eastleigh, so that proud 'railway town' is a popular place to reside. I just think Swaythling Athletic sounds better, more like the name of a football club, with real football roots. Saints would be unwise to change their name. Their roots go right back to the strong connections their founders had with St. Mary's Church and Saints are steeped in rich tradition and history. Ralph Krueger, Saints' new chairman has already stated that the club's history and tradition will be respected. Saints' name has long been very well known throughout the football world and beyond, so a name change would not make any commercial sense whatsoever. It is a far better idea to further grow the existing name into something much more high profile. What would be the point of starting from scratch with a new, unknown name, thus missing a great opportunity to capitalise more efficiently on a name that has already been growing for almost 130 years? Hull City do not have the commercial advantage that Saints have. Perhaps the Hull City owner might have asked Hull fans for name suggestions. 'Tigers' does not really seem to fit Hull City. Shame on you, Simon Carter, Daily Echo Sports Editor and writer of the article about which I'm commenting! Hampshire Cricket seem not to have shed as many as three words from their previous name. They dropped only 'County' and 'Club!'[/p][/quote]My father used to manage a team in the Hampshire League called Thornycroft Athletic (now defunct) and I saw many games between the two clubs when I was kid. Swaythling Athletic v Thornycroft Athletic on the front of a one page fold over programme, or vice versa, how can you get anything more English/British than that? Brilliant. Hope we win today. COYR STID. Spurs 1 Saints 2[/p][/quote]I couldn't agree more! One of my uncles played for Swaythling Athletic and I, too, watched such games as a youngster. I remember the old fold over programmes. The names of so many of our football clubs in the UK just sound typically British, some of them uniquely so. Accrington Stanley is one such name, which was almost lost forever years ago. I believe the sporting world is devalued when some football club owners change the name of their club. Hull City's owner seems not to have any grasp of the idea that it might actually be better commercially to retain his club's unusually short name and simply concentrate on growing the existing brand. I think he is missing an opportunity! justaSaintsfan
  • Score: 1

7:19am Mon 24 Mar 14

justaSaintsfan says...

wakeupbrits wrote:
Sorry George your wrong.
The Bears being named as such has nothing to do with another country.
The Warwickshire Bear and ragged Staff is a heraldic sign, normally referring to Richard Nevil, Earl of Warwick (1428 – 71), known as the king maker. In Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part Two, Act 5, scene 1, where there is much talk of bear baiting.
I have known Warwickshire as The Bears since i started watching them in the sixties, its nothing new.
justaSaintsfan & George: The same goes for Hull City AFC who for decades have had the nickname of The Tigers.
I can agrre on outsiders who want to change history to suit their own agenda just because they are rich and buy a club.
Trouble is they may own the club in terms of the shares, but they will never own it's soul or traditions and one day they will be gone and it will still be the fans who have the last say.
Wrexham fans forced their owner out when he wanted to build houses on the ground, Wimbledon fans started again after they were shafted by the FA and Football League, Coventry fans refuse to travel to Northampton for matches and Birmingham fans are boycotting over a jailed owner who passed the Football League and FA Premier League 'Fit and Proper Person' test when he already had a conviction in the Far East and has bought the club with laundered money.
Nicknames and traditional names for some of our football clubs are part of the rich sporting fabric of the UK. There is no reason to discard them and I think their continued use is essential, particularly to the fans.

A large number of Hull City's own fans don't want the owner to change the club's name and I can see their point. I wouldn't want Southampton FC to be changed to 'Southampton Saints.' It absolutely would not sound right and it is also too long. But I still refer to Southampton FC as the Saints and I always will.
[quote][p][bold]wakeupbrits[/bold] wrote: Sorry George your wrong. The Bears being named as such has nothing to do with another country. The Warwickshire Bear and ragged Staff is a heraldic sign, normally referring to Richard Nevil, Earl of Warwick (1428 – 71), known as the king maker. In Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part Two, Act 5, scene 1, where there is much talk of bear baiting. I have known Warwickshire as The Bears since i started watching them in the sixties, its nothing new. justaSaintsfan & George: The same goes for Hull City AFC who for decades have had the nickname of The Tigers. I can agrre on outsiders who want to change history to suit their own agenda just because they are rich and buy a club. Trouble is they may own the club in terms of the shares, but they will never own it's soul or traditions and one day they will be gone and it will still be the fans who have the last say. Wrexham fans forced their owner out when he wanted to build houses on the ground, Wimbledon fans started again after they were shafted by the FA and Football League, Coventry fans refuse to travel to Northampton for matches and Birmingham fans are boycotting over a jailed owner who passed the Football League and FA Premier League 'Fit and Proper Person' test when he already had a conviction in the Far East and has bought the club with laundered money.[/p][/quote]Nicknames and traditional names for some of our football clubs are part of the rich sporting fabric of the UK. There is no reason to discard them and I think their continued use is essential, particularly to the fans. A large number of Hull City's own fans don't want the owner to change the club's name and I can see their point. I wouldn't want Southampton FC to be changed to 'Southampton Saints.' It absolutely would not sound right and it is also too long. But I still refer to Southampton FC as the Saints and I always will. justaSaintsfan
  • Score: 1

9:22am Mon 24 Mar 14

drkensta says...

a bit of an odd one changing Swaythling Athletic to Eastleigh, because back in 1953 I played for Eastleigh Spartans who were in the Hampshire Division 3, Swaythling Athletic were in Hampshire Division 1. A come down for Swaythling having a name change to a club playing in a lower division.
a bit of an odd one changing Swaythling Athletic to Eastleigh, because back in 1953 I played for Eastleigh Spartans who were in the Hampshire Division 3, Swaythling Athletic were in Hampshire Division 1. A come down for Swaythling having a name change to a club playing in a lower division. drkensta
  • Score: 0

3:28pm Mon 24 Mar 14

justaSaintsfan says...

drkensta wrote:
a bit of an odd one changing Swaythling Athletic to Eastleigh, because back in 1953 I played for Eastleigh Spartans who were in the Hampshire Division 3, Swaythling Athletic were in Hampshire Division 1. A come down for Swaythling having a name change to a club playing in a lower division.
Eastleigh Spartans! Thanks for the reminder.
[quote][p][bold]drkensta[/bold] wrote: a bit of an odd one changing Swaythling Athletic to Eastleigh, because back in 1953 I played for Eastleigh Spartans who were in the Hampshire Division 3, Swaythling Athletic were in Hampshire Division 1. A come down for Swaythling having a name change to a club playing in a lower division.[/p][/quote]Eastleigh Spartans! Thanks for the reminder. justaSaintsfan
  • Score: 1

3:48pm Mon 24 Mar 14

lowe esteem says...

Bagamn wrote:
If you peruse the Clubs and their players in the English Leagues, try and find a team with all English names. When you listen to a commentary on the radio, it sounds the United Nations are having a kickabout. Wouldn't it be nice to have our own game back with a leather football and proper football boots.. Having a Manager that can't speak English is just a littler bit much.
? Some foreign sounding ones? All highly original and annexed to their
'birth places' like Aston Villa, Accrington Stanley, (Leyton) Orient -the list is endless and timeless -love 'em all.
The only highly unoriginal one I can think of is Milton Keynes Dons, which is a bastardised amalgam in every sense of the word- any proper Dons/ AFC Wimbledon readers should know that I've no plans to visit THAT ground-solidarity!
I think the Hull 'problem' may stem from a local identity crisis- I've watched Saints lose 5-0 at Hull City (AFC?) -then 'retired' to a local drinking club to watch Hull KR (Kingston Rovers) play Hull FC (they are an RFC) live on t'elly- and it's called Kingston upon Hull anyway. At least I found my way home.
[quote][p][bold]Bagamn[/bold] wrote: If you peruse the Clubs and their players in the English Leagues, try and find a team with all English names. When you listen to a commentary on the radio, it sounds the United Nations are having a kickabout. Wouldn't it be nice to have our own game back with a leather football and proper football boots.. Having a Manager that can't speak English is just a littler bit much.[/p][/quote]? Some foreign sounding ones? All highly original and annexed to their 'birth places' like Aston Villa, Accrington Stanley, (Leyton) Orient -the list is endless and timeless -love 'em all. The only highly unoriginal one I can think of is Milton Keynes Dons, which is a bastardised amalgam in every sense of the word- any proper Dons/ AFC Wimbledon readers should know that I've no plans to visit THAT ground-solidarity! I think the Hull 'problem' may stem from a local identity crisis- I've watched Saints lose 5-0 at Hull City (AFC?) -then 'retired' to a local drinking club to watch Hull KR (Kingston Rovers) play Hull FC (they are an RFC) live on t'elly- and it's called Kingston upon Hull anyway. At least I found my way home. lowe esteem
  • Score: 1

4:16pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Blackwaterblue says...

You should never change the name or the shirt........Whoops
You should never change the name or the shirt........Whoops Blackwaterblue
  • Score: 0

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