Cameron champions 'British values'

Hampshire Chronicle: David Cameron has said children should learn more about the Magna Carta as the document's 800th anniversary approaches David Cameron has said children should learn more about the Magna Carta as the document's 800th anniversary approaches

Extremism and division is flourishing in the UK because of a "worrying" failure to push British values, David Cameron said, as he set out plans to teach all school pupils about the Magna Carta.

Teachers were told by Education Secretary Michael Gove that in the wake of the controversy over Islamist influence on some Birmingham schools they must in future "actively promote British values".

The Prime Minister said they included "a belief in freedom, tolerance of others, accepting personal and social responsibility, respecting and upholding the rule of law".

Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips" and it was "not an option" for anyone living in this country not to live by them.

He also suggested that any move away from the "Western model" of democracy and free enterprise would threaten Britain's economic success.

With concerns high over more young Britons joining radical jihadists fighting in Syria and Iraq, he accepted that too much latitude had been allowed to opponents of democracy, equality and tolerance.

"In recent years we have been in danger of sending out a worrying message: that if you don't want to believe in democracy, that's fine; that if equality isn't your bag, don't worry about it; that if you're completely intolerant of others, we will still tolerate you.

"This has not just led to division, it has also allowed extremism - of both the violent and non-violent kind - to flourish," he said in the article.

"We need to be far more muscular in promoting British values and the institutions that uphold them.

"A genuinely liberal country believes in certain values, actively promotes them and says to its citizens: this is what defines us as a society."

Mr Cameron said it was "a matter of pride and patriotism" to promote British values and history and urged people to stop being "squeamish" about doing so.

"As president Obama put it when he addressed MPs and peers in Parliament, 'What began on this island would inspire millions throughout the continent of Europe and across the world'."

Celebrations are planned next year to mark 800 years since King John signed the Magna Carta at Runnymede which established for the first time that the king was subject to the law.

Mr Cameron said they will now include lessons for all pupils.

"The remaining copies of that charter may have faded, but its principles shine as brightly as ever, and they paved the way for the democracy, the equality, the respect and the laws that make Britain, Britain.

"So I want to use this upcoming 800th anniversary as an opportunity for every child to learn about the Magna Carta, for towns to commemorate it, for events to celebrate it."

Mr Gove pledged "decisive action" after schools inspector Ofsted issued a damning verdict on the running of a number of Birmingham's schools.

Inspections conducted following claims of a takeover plot by hardline Muslims found that a "culture of fear and intimidation" has developed in some schools and, in several, governors exerted "inappropriate influence" over how they are being run.

A poll by Opinium for the Observer showed that 58% of voters believe faith schools should not receive taxpayer funding, or be closed altogether.

It found three quarters are concerned there is a serious risk pupils could be encouraged to adopt extremist views in predominantly Muslim schools.

Most, 56%, also thought all faith schools should not be allowed to teach only their own religion.

None of those which faced inspections over the "Trojan Horse" allegations were faith schools but shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt said he would like cross-party talks on the issue.

"Events in Birmingham have raised questions about faith, multiculturalism and state education and in the aftermath this is the moment to think about discussing, on a cross-party basis, how we manage potential tensions, particularly in urban districts," he told the newspaper.

He called for strong powers for Ofsted to inspect teaching of religion and backed the idea that schools should teach about other faiths.

British Humanist Association chief executive Andrew Copson said: "As things stand, 100% state funded "faith" schools can and typically do teach one religion as true and all others are false, while non-religious worldviews are often ignored entirely. They turn children away because their parents are of the 'wrong' religion or no religion, and they refuse to hire the best qualified staff for the same reason.

"The proportion of secondary-age pupils in religious state schools has gone up by 20% over the course of this century with no meaningful political debate of whether this is desirable, never mind about popular. That Tristram Hunt is now proposing to look again at some aspects of this system is to be welcomed."

Comments (6)

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8:58am Sun 15 Jun 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

"Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips""

Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)
"Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips"" Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;) Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 2

9:17am Sun 15 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

This clown is so far from reality he will soon be seen as a danger to us all.

Quoting Magna Carta is one thing, putting in to effect b y rigid legislative means it's principles is another, and one that needs urgent attention . We are far from settling the matter of Islam within our relatively loose constitutional established way of life.

For years wed have allowed the fifth column, mild and compliant as it seemed, to winkle it;s way under our civilised skin, now we see the eruptions as it perpetually seeks to test the mettle of our tolerance.

If Cameron and the rest, of all party persuasions, wish to get the matter in hand, then bloody well legislate this cult out of our life.

Cut across Magna Carta and develop a new mandate that effectively curtails the spread of it's intentions, remove all outward manifestations of adherence by forcing it indoors where it should never be allowed out into the public view, no desert style dress in schools, offices, universities, anywhere at all. Either this religious order adopts and adapts voluntarily,or it will be made to so do legislatively. So far the softly softly approach has not worked, it has expanded it's hold on many communities, and now we are having to excise the cancerous spread from schools that have been infected with radicalism. How far must these actions go before the people themselves rise up and react.

Time we put an end to the creeping infestation, nip it in the bud before we cross the Rubicon to discover we have left it too late?

Cameron, this could be your day, take a grip and do what a large part of our population is crying out for. Legislate, and to hell with both Islamic radicalisation and any possible reactive consequences.

We can take all that can be dished out...the question is however, why should we, when it is still possible to stop the progress of Islam within our British society?
This clown is so far from reality he will soon be seen as a danger to us all. Quoting Magna Carta is one thing, putting in to effect b y rigid legislative means it's principles is another, and one that needs urgent attention . We are far from settling the matter of Islam within our relatively loose constitutional established way of life. For years wed have allowed the fifth column, mild and compliant as it seemed, to winkle it;s way under our civilised skin, now we see the eruptions as it perpetually seeks to test the mettle of our tolerance. If Cameron and the rest, of all party persuasions, wish to get the matter in hand, then bloody well legislate this cult out of our life. Cut across Magna Carta and develop a new mandate that effectively curtails the spread of it's intentions, remove all outward manifestations of adherence by forcing it indoors where it should never be allowed out into the public view, no desert style dress in schools, offices, universities, anywhere at all. Either this religious order adopts and adapts voluntarily,or it will be made to so do legislatively. So far the softly softly approach has not worked, it has expanded it's hold on many communities, and now we are having to excise the cancerous spread from schools that have been infected with radicalism. How far must these actions go before the people themselves rise up and react. Time we put an end to the creeping infestation, nip it in the bud before we cross the Rubicon to discover we have left it too late? Cameron, this could be your day, take a grip and do what a large part of our population is crying out for. Legislate, and to hell with both Islamic radicalisation and any possible reactive consequences. We can take all that can be dished out...the question is however, why should we, when it is still possible to stop the progress of Islam within our British society? varteg1
  • Score: -2

9:24am Sun 15 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
"Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips""

Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)
Maybe fish and chips was a poor example, perhaps he should have said Chicken curry. Which is, according to some polls, the most popular high street take away.
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: "Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips"" Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)[/p][/quote]Maybe fish and chips was a poor example, perhaps he should have said Chicken curry. Which is, according to some polls, the most popular high street take away. varteg1
  • Score: 1

12:19pm Mon 16 Jun 14

pauls55 says...

Is Cameron having a laugh? Magna Carta: when the rich and powerful Barons told the state that they were going to do whatever the hell they liked. Mind you it is a perfect example of a tory run Britain I guess.
Is Cameron having a laugh? Magna Carta: when the rich and powerful Barons told the state that they were going to do whatever the hell they liked. Mind you it is a perfect example of a tory run Britain I guess. pauls55
  • Score: 0

1:29pm Mon 16 Jun 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

varteg1 wrote:
Katie Re-Registered wrote:
"Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips""

Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)
Maybe fish and chips was a poor example, perhaps he should have said Chicken curry. Which is, according to some polls, the most popular high street take away.
Interestingly, there's a theory that curry was originally invented by British army cooks during the days of the Raj as a means of preserving meat rations in hot weather conditions for as long as possible.
[quote][p][bold]varteg1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: "Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips"" Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)[/p][/quote]Maybe fish and chips was a poor example, perhaps he should have said Chicken curry. Which is, according to some polls, the most popular high street take away.[/p][/quote]Interestingly, there's a theory that curry was originally invented by British army cooks during the days of the Raj as a means of preserving meat rations in hot weather conditions for as long as possible. Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 0

7:30pm Mon 16 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
varteg1 wrote:
Katie Re-Registered wrote:
"Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips""

Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)
Maybe fish and chips was a poor example, perhaps he should have said Chicken curry. Which is, according to some polls, the most popular high street take away.
Interestingly, there's a theory that curry was originally invented by British army cooks during the days of the Raj as a means of preserving meat rations in hot weather conditions for as long as possible.
Many different stories abound, a doctor I was once under told me the use of curry was to mask bad meat or meat that was cow meat, so the Hindu couldn't tell it was cow meat, the cow being sacred to the Hindu.

A bit from Wiki.....

...Dishes of highly spiced meat are thought to have originated in pre-historic times among the inhabitants of the Indus Valley Civilization. Archaeological evidence dating to 2600 BCE from Mohenjo-daro suggests the use of mortar and pestle to pound spices including mustard, fennel, cumin, and tamarind pods with which they flavoured food. Such dishes are also recorded during the Vedic Period of Indian history, roughly 1700 to 500 BCE
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]varteg1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: "Writing in the Mail on Sunday he said they were "as British as the Union Flag, as football, as fish and chips"" Actually, fish and chips is a relatively recent archetypally British dish. There were no fish and chip shops in Britain until around 150 years' ago when an eastern European immigrant decided to combine battered fish (a traditional east European Jewish dish) and fried potatoes (traditionally Portuguese) in the same meal. So fish and chips is a good example of the benefits that cultural diversity can bring us. (*Shhhh...don't let Ukip hear as they'll get very cross;)[/p][/quote]Maybe fish and chips was a poor example, perhaps he should have said Chicken curry. Which is, according to some polls, the most popular high street take away.[/p][/quote]Interestingly, there's a theory that curry was originally invented by British army cooks during the days of the Raj as a means of preserving meat rations in hot weather conditions for as long as possible.[/p][/quote]Many different stories abound, a doctor I was once under told me the use of curry was to mask bad meat or meat that was cow meat, so the Hindu couldn't tell it was cow meat, the cow being sacred to the Hindu. A bit from Wiki..... ...Dishes of highly spiced meat are thought to have originated in pre-historic times among the inhabitants of the Indus Valley Civilization.[9] Archaeological evidence dating to 2600 BCE from Mohenjo-daro suggests the use of mortar and pestle to pound spices including mustard, fennel, cumin, and tamarind pods with which they flavoured food.[10] Such dishes are also recorded during the Vedic Period of Indian history, roughly 1700 to 500 BCE varteg1
  • Score: 0
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