Dolly offers to keep namesake dog

Hampshire Chronicle: Dolly Parton performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Dolly Parton performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.

Dolly Parton works from Nine to Five - but she might have to find time to be a pet owner too after she offered to adopt a dog left behind at Glastonbury.

The country legend said she would take in the white lurcher if her owner is not found.

The canine was discovered in a tent during a clean-up after thousands of festival-goers left the site.

She was named Dolly after the star, who stole the show with her first ever performance at the event a week ago.

The dog was taken in by the Happy Landings animal shelter, which is close to the Glastonbury venue at Worthy Farm in Somerset.

Parton, 68, said: " I had my manager call the Happy Landings animal shelter to make sure the dog is being treated and cared for properly.

"At this time, nobody has claimed the dog and the dog is in great hands at the shelter. I will take the dog home to America if nobody claims her within a reasonable amount of time."

She also sent a video message saying she is "very honoured and flattered" that the dog had been named after her.

It is not the first time the singer has had an animal named in her honour.

After Dolly the Sheep became the world's first successfully cloned mammal, doctors revealed she was so-named because she was derived from a mammary gland cell - and they said they could not think of a more impressive pair of glands than Parton's.

In a message on its website, Happy Landings said Dolly the dog is a "sweet-natured older lady" who arrived with a "serious ear infection".

The shelter said it had received many phone calls from concerned members of the public after the dog's plight emerged.

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