Anti-social behaviour biggest concern in Winchester suburb

Anti-social behaviour biggest concern in Winchester suburb

Anti-social behaviour biggest concern in Winchester suburb

First published in Winchester

ANTI-Social behaviour in Hyde was the biggest concern at a recent meeting between residents of central Winchester and the police.

Problems there largely involve visitors from outside the area drinking alcohol and causing a general nuisance, police say.

The Police and Communities Together (PACT) meeting at Winchester Fire Station saw local people put their concerns to officers in an effort to establish policing priorities.

Following the meeting on Monday (January 14), Sgt Matt Fancett, of the Winchester Safer Neighbourhoods Team, said: “We have already focussed on this area by forming a robust action plan. This involves dealing fairly and firmly with issues in the area. We can use our powers of seizing alcohol, dispersing individuals likely to cause a problem, and working closely with local establishments. The area has already been deemed an area of high priority, and you will see more police vehicles patrolling the area and completing paperwork from their vehicles in the area.”

At a similar meeting in November last year, police said reported incidents in Hyde had dropped by a third following a crackdown after residents pointed the finger at nearby support centres for homeless people.

However, the top three priorities for police will remain the same: anti-social behaviour in Hyde, in Winnall (particularly around Garbett Road), and in Highcliffe.

Comments (1)

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7:57pm Wed 16 Jan 13

huckit P says...

Why can't the police simply do their job - policing their patch - without resorting to forming committee's, action groups and teams? Why on earth does it need meetings to discuss problems when a phone call from a resident to the police should elicit a swift response? Perhaps time would be better spent actually walking the beat or patrolling it in a vehicle. And as for dealing with offenders robustly; why can't they simply be dealt with by applying existing law?
Is this too simple?
Why can't the police simply do their job - policing their patch - without resorting to forming committee's, action groups and teams? Why on earth does it need meetings to discuss problems when a phone call from a resident to the police should elicit a swift response? Perhaps time would be better spent actually walking the beat or patrolling it in a vehicle. And as for dealing with offenders robustly; why can't they simply be dealt with by applying existing law? Is this too simple? huckit P
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