Southampton mum calls for stronger safeguards after eight-year-old son escapes and walks a mile home on his own

Hampshire Chronicle: Eight-year-old Zack Harrison with parents Kelly and Ian Eight-year-old Zack Harrison with parents Kelly and Ian

AN eight-year-old boy managed to escape from school – and walk nearly a mile home on his own.

Zack Harrison’s mum, Kelly, fears her son could have been killed crossing a busy road after he climbed over a locked school gate.

Now she is calling on education chiefs to put more safeguards in place and claims it is not the first time it has happened.

But school bosses say they are “confident” staff acted responsibly in the build-up to the incident and said his support assistants were watching him closely as he made his way home.

Zack, who suffers with autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), escaped from Mansel Park Primary School in Millbrook, Southamp-ton, despite two learning support assistants supervising him.

His mum told the Daily Echo he was able to cross a busy main road on his own and walk to the family home in Buttermere Close.

Kelly, who was having her hair cut at the time, said she had a phone call from the school’s office to inform her that her son had gone missing.

Panicked Kelly spent ten minutes driving around the estate before finding him on top of a garage in the close – with the two school staff nearby.

Kelly, 38, said: “It’s not the first time this has happened.

“I had a phone call from the school office and they asked if I was around as ‘he’s escaped’.

“He’s only part-time because of his ADHD and autism, but they are not coping well with him.” She added: “He said ‘mummy, I just wanted to come and see you’. I am very upset – he could have been killed.

“Where he is running around the school and getting himself in danger, it’s a constant wait for a call from the school.”

Kelly and Zach’s dad Ian are hoping a review of their son’s situation could help him get a place at a special school in the city that would be more appropriate to his needs.

A spokesman for Mansel Park Primary School said Zach’s two support assistants tried to talk him down from the school gates.

He said: “Zack left the school building and climbed a school gate to exit the school grounds.

“At all times his support assistants were present and tried repeatedly to talk him down and calm the situation.

“After Zack escaped the grounds our staff were in constant contact with the school and kept watch over him as he made his way home. We also gained contact with the parents to let them know what was happening.

“We are confident that staff acted responsibly and in the best interest of Zack and went above and beyond to ensure he remained as safe as possible.

“Zack’s placement at our school is currently awaiting review by the Special Educational Needs Panel and we will do everything we can to support Zack while this process takes place.”

Comments (46)

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7:33am Mon 24 Mar 14

Dai Rear says...

When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.
When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it. Dai Rear
  • Score: 32

7:46am Mon 24 Mar 14

wwozzer says...

Doesn't sound like he escaped to me, sounds like he just decided he wanted to go home and the staff had no choice but to follow him and keep an eye in him because they're not able to physically restrain him. He is obviously in the wrong school and needs help.
Doesn't sound like he escaped to me, sounds like he just decided he wanted to go home and the staff had no choice but to follow him and keep an eye in him because they're not able to physically restrain him. He is obviously in the wrong school and needs help. wwozzer
  • Score: 109

8:04am Mon 24 Mar 14

Forest Resident says...

short of putting 10ft razor wire fences around every school, locking all of the doors, and/or putting children in irons what exactly do parents such as these think schools can actually do to keep students on site who choose to leave of their own accord?
short of putting 10ft razor wire fences around every school, locking all of the doors, and/or putting children in irons what exactly do parents such as these think schools can actually do to keep students on site who choose to leave of their own accord? Forest Resident
  • Score: 70

8:11am Mon 24 Mar 14

SwedeSaint says...

Mum should really be calling for expediency for the special needs review panel. From what's reported it seems to me that the school has acted responsibly. Unfair of her to knock the school that is obviously not equipped to deal with her child, but is forced to at the moment based on catchment.
Mum should really be calling for expediency for the special needs review panel. From what's reported it seems to me that the school has acted responsibly. Unfair of her to knock the school that is obviously not equipped to deal with her child, but is forced to at the moment based on catchment. SwedeSaint
  • Score: 59

8:12am Mon 24 Mar 14

Brite Spark says...

He needs a bit of discipline and hopefully this was beaten into him when his dad came home from work.
"Bend a tree when it is young"
He needs a bit of discipline and hopefully this was beaten into him when his dad came home from work. "Bend a tree when it is young" Brite Spark
  • Score: -14

8:15am Mon 24 Mar 14

massimoosti says...

The exact cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood. It is thought ADHD is caused by a mix of genetic (inherited) and environmental factors.

Genetics
ADHD tends to run in families and, in most cases, it is thought inheriting the condition is the most likely cause. Research shows that both parents and siblings of a child with ADHD are four to five times more likely to have ADHD themselves.

Brain function and anatomy
Research shows that the way the brain works in people with ADHD differs from that of people who do not have the condition. It is thought chemicals in the brain that carry messages, known as neurotransmitters, do not work properly in people with ADHD. Also, people with the condition seem to display less activity in the parts of their brains that control activity and attention.

Some research shows that the frontal lobes, the part of the brain that controls decision-making, do not work as they should in people with ADHD. Other research indicates they may have imbalances in the levels of certain chemicals, such as noradrenaline and dopamine.

Exposure to toxins during pregnancy
Women who drink alcohol when pregnant are more likely to have a child with ADHD. It is also thought that smoking and drug abuse can also increase the risks of ADHD in an unborn child.

Being male
Boys are more commonly diagnosed with childhood ADHD than girls, and more men are diagnosed with the condition than women. Research suggests this could be because diagnosis tends to pinpoint loud, disruptive behaviour, which is more noticeable and more common in males than in females.

It could also be that ADHD is missed in girls because they tend to have the form of the condition defined by inattentiveness (ADHD mainly inattentive, or attention deficit disorder).

Excessive exposure to television
There have been several studies that have looked at the relationship between children watching a lot of television at a very young age and the development of ADHD in later childhood.

There is not enough evidence to say television is definitely a cause of ADHD, but allowing children up to the age of three to watch several hours a day could contribute to attention problems and ADHD in later life.
The exact cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood. It is thought ADHD is caused by a mix of genetic (inherited) and environmental factors. Genetics ADHD tends to run in families and, in most cases, it is thought inheriting the condition is the most likely cause. Research shows that both parents and siblings of a child with ADHD are four to five times more likely to have ADHD themselves. Brain function and anatomy Research shows that the way the brain works in people with ADHD differs from that of people who do not have the condition. It is thought chemicals in the brain that carry messages, known as neurotransmitters, do not work properly in people with ADHD. Also, people with the condition seem to display less activity in the parts of their brains that control activity and attention. Some research shows that the frontal lobes, the part of the brain that controls decision-making, do not work as they should in people with ADHD. Other research indicates they may have imbalances in the levels of certain chemicals, such as noradrenaline and dopamine. Exposure to toxins during pregnancy Women who drink alcohol when pregnant are more likely to have a child with ADHD. It is also thought that smoking and drug abuse can also increase the risks of ADHD in an unborn child. Being male Boys are more commonly diagnosed with childhood ADHD than girls, and more men are diagnosed with the condition than women. Research suggests this could be because diagnosis tends to pinpoint loud, disruptive behaviour, which is more noticeable and more common in males than in females. It could also be that ADHD is missed in girls because they tend to have the form of the condition defined by inattentiveness (ADHD mainly inattentive, or attention deficit disorder). Excessive exposure to television There have been several studies that have looked at the relationship between children watching a lot of television at a very young age and the development of ADHD in later childhood. There is not enough evidence to say television is definitely a cause of ADHD, but allowing children up to the age of three to watch several hours a day could contribute to attention problems and ADHD in later life. massimoosti
  • Score: -6

8:20am Mon 24 Mar 14

SotonGreen says...

Schools are not prisons nor are they secure mental institutions something these parents would do well to remember. What they are is places of learning providing a safe and supportive environment to pupils who wish to learn.
Schools are not prisons nor are they secure mental institutions something these parents would do well to remember. What they are is places of learning providing a safe and supportive environment to pupils who wish to learn. SotonGreen
  • Score: 50

8:41am Mon 24 Mar 14

Dai Rear says...

massimoosti wrote:
The exact cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood. It is thought ADHD is caused by a mix of genetic (inherited) and environmental factors.

Genetics
ADHD tends to run in families and, in most cases, it is thought inheriting the condition is the most likely cause. Research shows that both parents and siblings of a child with ADHD are four to five times more likely to have ADHD themselves.

Brain function and anatomy
Research shows that the way the brain works in people with ADHD differs from that of people who do not have the condition. It is thought chemicals in the brain that carry messages, known as neurotransmitters, do not work properly in people with ADHD. Also, people with the condition seem to display less activity in the parts of their brains that control activity and attention.

Some research shows that the frontal lobes, the part of the brain that controls decision-making, do not work as they should in people with ADHD. Other research indicates they may have imbalances in the levels of certain chemicals, such as noradrenaline and dopamine.

Exposure to toxins during pregnancy
Women who drink alcohol when pregnant are more likely to have a child with ADHD. It is also thought that smoking and drug abuse can also increase the risks of ADHD in an unborn child.

Being male
Boys are more commonly diagnosed with childhood ADHD than girls, and more men are diagnosed with the condition than women. Research suggests this could be because diagnosis tends to pinpoint loud, disruptive behaviour, which is more noticeable and more common in males than in females.

It could also be that ADHD is missed in girls because they tend to have the form of the condition defined by inattentiveness (ADHD mainly inattentive, or attention deficit disorder).

Excessive exposure to television
There have been several studies that have looked at the relationship between children watching a lot of television at a very young age and the development of ADHD in later childhood.

There is not enough evidence to say television is definitely a cause of ADHD, but allowing children up to the age of three to watch several hours a day could contribute to attention problems and ADHD in later life.
Or it could be a case of "medicalising" what are socially determined factors. Perhaps if Hitler had been dosed up with Ritalin.......
[quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: The exact cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood. It is thought ADHD is caused by a mix of genetic (inherited) and environmental factors. Genetics ADHD tends to run in families and, in most cases, it is thought inheriting the condition is the most likely cause. Research shows that both parents and siblings of a child with ADHD are four to five times more likely to have ADHD themselves. Brain function and anatomy Research shows that the way the brain works in people with ADHD differs from that of people who do not have the condition. It is thought chemicals in the brain that carry messages, known as neurotransmitters, do not work properly in people with ADHD. Also, people with the condition seem to display less activity in the parts of their brains that control activity and attention. Some research shows that the frontal lobes, the part of the brain that controls decision-making, do not work as they should in people with ADHD. Other research indicates they may have imbalances in the levels of certain chemicals, such as noradrenaline and dopamine. Exposure to toxins during pregnancy Women who drink alcohol when pregnant are more likely to have a child with ADHD. It is also thought that smoking and drug abuse can also increase the risks of ADHD in an unborn child. Being male Boys are more commonly diagnosed with childhood ADHD than girls, and more men are diagnosed with the condition than women. Research suggests this could be because diagnosis tends to pinpoint loud, disruptive behaviour, which is more noticeable and more common in males than in females. It could also be that ADHD is missed in girls because they tend to have the form of the condition defined by inattentiveness (ADHD mainly inattentive, or attention deficit disorder). Excessive exposure to television There have been several studies that have looked at the relationship between children watching a lot of television at a very young age and the development of ADHD in later childhood. There is not enough evidence to say television is definitely a cause of ADHD, but allowing children up to the age of three to watch several hours a day could contribute to attention problems and ADHD in later life.[/p][/quote]Or it could be a case of "medicalising" what are socially determined factors. Perhaps if Hitler had been dosed up with Ritalin....... Dai Rear
  • Score: 2

9:00am Mon 24 Mar 14

florence37 says...

Get him into a special school so he can't disrupt the other kids at the school
Get him into a special school so he can't disrupt the other kids at the school florence37
  • Score: 21

9:28am Mon 24 Mar 14

GeekChic says...

Dai Rear wrote:
When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.
In the past many were institutionalised or subjected to abuse. The fact that there wasn't a name for a condition doesn't mean it didn't exist. If you go along with your way of thinking then there are many things that wouldn't exist.

That aside I don't think that the parents were correct in their decision to go to the papers as this hasn't served any plosive purpose. The statement process doesn't look at the local rag and splashing your son's photo across paper for the difficulties he's facing through his special needs in this manner could do more harm than good. This is due to ignorant individuals who have no education or reasoned understanding of the autistic spectrum and instead vet their kicks by making stupid comments.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.[/p][/quote]In the past many were institutionalised or subjected to abuse. The fact that there wasn't a name for a condition doesn't mean it didn't exist. If you go along with your way of thinking then there are many things that wouldn't exist. That aside I don't think that the parents were correct in their decision to go to the papers as this hasn't served any plosive purpose. The statement process doesn't look at the local rag and splashing your son's photo across paper for the difficulties he's facing through his special needs in this manner could do more harm than good. This is due to ignorant individuals who have no education or reasoned understanding of the autistic spectrum and instead vet their kicks by making stupid comments. GeekChic
  • Score: 22

9:30am Mon 24 Mar 14

GeekChic says...

*get
*get GeekChic
  • Score: 2

9:35am Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

massimoosti wrote:
The exact cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood. It is thought ADHD is caused by a mix of genetic (inherited) and environmental factors.

Genetics
ADHD tends to run in families and, in most cases, it is thought inheriting the condition is the most likely cause. Research shows that both parents and siblings of a child with ADHD are four to five times more likely to have ADHD themselves.

Brain function and anatomy
Research shows that the way the brain works in people with ADHD differs from that of people who do not have the condition. It is thought chemicals in the brain that carry messages, known as neurotransmitters, do not work properly in people with ADHD. Also, people with the condition seem to display less activity in the parts of their brains that control activity and attention.

Some research shows that the frontal lobes, the part of the brain that controls decision-making, do not work as they should in people with ADHD. Other research indicates they may have imbalances in the levels of certain chemicals, such as noradrenaline and dopamine.

Exposure to toxins during pregnancy
Women who drink alcohol when pregnant are more likely to have a child with ADHD. It is also thought that smoking and drug abuse can also increase the risks of ADHD in an unborn child.

Being male
Boys are more commonly diagnosed with childhood ADHD than girls, and more men are diagnosed with the condition than women. Research suggests this could be because diagnosis tends to pinpoint loud, disruptive behaviour, which is more noticeable and more common in males than in females.

It could also be that ADHD is missed in girls because they tend to have the form of the condition defined by inattentiveness (ADHD mainly inattentive, or attention deficit disorder).

Excessive exposure to television
There have been several studies that have looked at the relationship between children watching a lot of television at a very young age and the development of ADHD in later childhood.

There is not enough evidence to say television is definitely a cause of ADHD, but allowing children up to the age of three to watch several hours a day could contribute to attention problems and ADHD in later life.
What IS the matter with forum readers? Somebody here has taken the trouble to tell us all about ADHD (thank-you, massimoosti, I mean that), and the jealous, "uneddykated" yobs downvote it !

This is NOT Twitter. It is not a gossip-and-go column. It's a discussion forum.

Unfortunately, being diagnosed with autism is a bit like the doctor saying you've got "a virus" - it covers a whole multitude of specific conditions, as massimoosti has pointed out, such as ADHD.

It can take literally years to get a child formally statemented, and the necessary funding to enable a school to fully meet the child's needs. In the right setting, children with HF autism can flourish, and those with LF can be well-protected. The Hampshire Autistic Society, and the pioneering Alison Hope-West have made tremendous progress in raising awareness, running training courses, recruiting support, and developing strategies to help both the children and their families. Prior to this, and the development of "special needs" departments, most children with autism were dumped, undiagnosed, in units for ESN's (Educationally Sub Normal ! And before that they were officially categorised as "feeble-minded" ! Unbelieveable.)

Zack is 8. Three years in the school system, and still no statement? The Special Needs Review Panel are catastrophically slow, as they do not like "labelling" children at such a young age. Their attitude is well-known to many Southampton parents whose children's educational development has been seriously impeded by the panel's ponderousness.

Personally, I think the school handled the situation extremely well. Let's hope the publicity will motivate the review panel to award Zack his legal entitlement.
[quote][p][bold]massimoosti[/bold] wrote: The exact cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood. It is thought ADHD is caused by a mix of genetic (inherited) and environmental factors. Genetics ADHD tends to run in families and, in most cases, it is thought inheriting the condition is the most likely cause. Research shows that both parents and siblings of a child with ADHD are four to five times more likely to have ADHD themselves. Brain function and anatomy Research shows that the way the brain works in people with ADHD differs from that of people who do not have the condition. It is thought chemicals in the brain that carry messages, known as neurotransmitters, do not work properly in people with ADHD. Also, people with the condition seem to display less activity in the parts of their brains that control activity and attention. Some research shows that the frontal lobes, the part of the brain that controls decision-making, do not work as they should in people with ADHD. Other research indicates they may have imbalances in the levels of certain chemicals, such as noradrenaline and dopamine. Exposure to toxins during pregnancy Women who drink alcohol when pregnant are more likely to have a child with ADHD. It is also thought that smoking and drug abuse can also increase the risks of ADHD in an unborn child. Being male Boys are more commonly diagnosed with childhood ADHD than girls, and more men are diagnosed with the condition than women. Research suggests this could be because diagnosis tends to pinpoint loud, disruptive behaviour, which is more noticeable and more common in males than in females. It could also be that ADHD is missed in girls because they tend to have the form of the condition defined by inattentiveness (ADHD mainly inattentive, or attention deficit disorder). Excessive exposure to television There have been several studies that have looked at the relationship between children watching a lot of television at a very young age and the development of ADHD in later childhood. There is not enough evidence to say television is definitely a cause of ADHD, but allowing children up to the age of three to watch several hours a day could contribute to attention problems and ADHD in later life.[/p][/quote]What IS the matter with forum readers? Somebody here has taken the trouble to tell us all about ADHD (thank-you, massimoosti, I mean that), and the jealous, "uneddykated" yobs downvote it ! This is NOT Twitter. It is not a gossip-and-go column. It's a discussion forum. Unfortunately, being diagnosed with autism is a bit like the doctor saying you've got "a virus" - it covers a whole multitude of specific conditions, as massimoosti has pointed out, such as ADHD. It can take literally years to get a child formally statemented, and the necessary funding to enable a school to fully meet the child's needs. In the right setting, children with HF autism can flourish, and those with LF can be well-protected. The Hampshire Autistic Society, and the pioneering Alison Hope-West have made tremendous progress in raising awareness, running training courses, recruiting support, and developing strategies to help both the children and their families. Prior to this, and the development of "special needs" departments, most children with autism were dumped, undiagnosed, in units for ESN's (Educationally Sub Normal ! And before that they were officially categorised as "feeble-minded" ! Unbelieveable.) Zack is 8. Three years in the school system, and still no statement? The Special Needs Review Panel are catastrophically slow, as they do not like "labelling" children at such a young age. Their attitude is well-known to many Southampton parents whose children's educational development has been seriously impeded by the panel's ponderousness. Personally, I think the school handled the situation extremely well. Let's hope the publicity will motivate the review panel to award Zack his legal entitlement. charrlee
  • Score: 25

9:40am Mon 24 Mar 14

robbutler1984 says...

Dai Rear wrote:
When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.
I wasn't expecting to see someone say they went to school in a village in Buckinghamshire in the Daily Echo! But I went to school in Wendover too, I managed to escape once and made it half way home I think I got to about RAF Halton before I got caught. Was trying to get to Aston Clinton.

But I have had situations like this as a teaching assistant, it is a very difficult situation because you can't really grab them to stop them so if your words don't work then they'll just keep going. Luckily the times i've done it the child usually just stayed fairly close to the school.
[quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.[/p][/quote]I wasn't expecting to see someone say they went to school in a village in Buckinghamshire in the Daily Echo! But I went to school in Wendover too, I managed to escape once and made it half way home I think I got to about RAF Halton before I got caught. Was trying to get to Aston Clinton. But I have had situations like this as a teaching assistant, it is a very difficult situation because you can't really grab them to stop them so if your words don't work then they'll just keep going. Luckily the times i've done it the child usually just stayed fairly close to the school. robbutler1984
  • Score: 8

9:57am Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

GeekChic wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.
In the past many were institutionalised or subjected to abuse. The fact that there wasn't a name for a condition doesn't mean it didn't exist. If you go along with your way of thinking then there are many things that wouldn't exist.

That aside I don't think that the parents were correct in their decision to go to the papers as this hasn't served any plosive purpose. The statement process doesn't look at the local rag and splashing your son's photo across paper for the difficulties he's facing through his special needs in this manner could do more harm than good. This is due to ignorant individuals who have no education or reasoned understanding of the autistic spectrum and instead vet their kicks by making stupid comments.
You are very wrong to present such a distorted view of aspects which you have quite correctly identified, yet have limited understanding.

Did the parents "go to the papers", or did "the papers" go to them?

If you know as much about spectrum disorders as you appear to want us to think, you will know that ADHD symptoms become clearly noticeable from the age of 2, if not earlier. So the parents have been struggling along for up to SIX YEARS without any official confirmation of their child's condition. He will have been sent home from school every time he disrupted a lesson if the school was not able to contain him. And if they were able to contain him, without a statement, the containment would have been effectively depriving other children of extra support from the general classroom assistants.
[quote][p][bold]GeekChic[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.[/p][/quote]In the past many were institutionalised or subjected to abuse. The fact that there wasn't a name for a condition doesn't mean it didn't exist. If you go along with your way of thinking then there are many things that wouldn't exist. That aside I don't think that the parents were correct in their decision to go to the papers as this hasn't served any plosive purpose. The statement process doesn't look at the local rag and splashing your son's photo across paper for the difficulties he's facing through his special needs in this manner could do more harm than good. This is due to ignorant individuals who have no education or reasoned understanding of the autistic spectrum and instead vet their kicks by making stupid comments.[/p][/quote]You are very wrong to present such a distorted view of aspects which you have quite correctly identified, yet have limited understanding. Did the parents "go to the papers", or did "the papers" go to them? If you know as much about spectrum disorders as you appear to want us to think, you will know that ADHD symptoms become clearly noticeable from the age of 2, if not earlier. So the parents have been struggling along for up to SIX YEARS without any official confirmation of their child's condition. He will have been sent home from school every time he disrupted a lesson if the school was not able to contain him. And if they were able to contain him, without a statement, the containment would have been effectively depriving other children of extra support from the general classroom assistants. charrlee
  • Score: 0

10:14am Mon 24 Mar 14

RedDan says...

Completely misleading headline.
Completely misleading headline. RedDan
  • Score: 22

10:18am Mon 24 Mar 14

RedDan says...

Completely misleading headline. He was supervised at all times & Buttermere Close is 500yrds from the school.
Completely misleading headline. He was supervised at all times & Buttermere Close is 500yrds from the school. RedDan
  • Score: 33

11:12am Mon 24 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to.

ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.
Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to. ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting. From the sidelines
  • Score: 9

11:26am Mon 24 Mar 14

cliffwalker says...

Another sensationalist headline, so what's new?

The school staff seems to have acted above and beyond the call of duty in this. Prevented, today, from dealing with the matter with physical restraint, they did their best to protect the boy from his actions.

As has been said elsewhere, a school is not a prison and should have only the most essential security measures.
Another sensationalist headline, so what's new? The school staff seems to have acted above and beyond the call of duty in this. Prevented, today, from dealing with the matter with physical restraint, they did their best to protect the boy from his actions. As has been said elsewhere, a school is not a prison and should have only the most essential security measures. cliffwalker
  • Score: 20

11:39am Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

From the sidelines wrote:
Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to.

ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.
Interestingly, you have a very good point. A child with autism can demonstrate similar "symptoms" to a badly-behaved, poorly-reared child. However, it is when you spend time with them, seeing them in a variety of moods, situations and circumstances that you recognise the difference.

There are some very unpleasent parents with an excellent child, and some good parents with a very difficult child. Parents with three children, one of whom has spectrum disorders - would they have selected one for bad parenting whilst doing the job right with the other two?

I've simply pointed these factors out in case you actually believe the provocative hogwash you have written.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to. ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.[/p][/quote]Interestingly, you have a very good point. A child with autism can demonstrate similar "symptoms" to a badly-behaved, poorly-reared child. However, it is when you spend time with them, seeing them in a variety of moods, situations and circumstances that you recognise the difference. There are some very unpleasent parents with an excellent child, and some good parents with a very difficult child. Parents with three children, one of whom has spectrum disorders - would they have selected one for bad parenting whilst doing the job right with the other two? I've simply pointed these factors out in case you actually believe the provocative hogwash you have written. charrlee
  • Score: 11

12:10pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Mary80 says...

Or maybe parents TELL their child not to leave school maybe thats a far better solution than "blame the school". Parents MUST take some of the blame they should be telling their kids not to just walk out of school if they feel like it and at EIGHT bloody years old too
Or maybe parents TELL their child not to leave school maybe thats a far better solution than "blame the school". Parents MUST take some of the blame they should be telling their kids not to just walk out of school if they feel like it and at EIGHT bloody years old too Mary80
  • Score: 15

12:16pm Mon 24 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

charrlee wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to.

ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.
Interestingly, you have a very good point. A child with autism can demonstrate similar "symptoms" to a badly-behaved, poorly-reared child. However, it is when you spend time with them, seeing them in a variety of moods, situations and circumstances that you recognise the difference.

There are some very unpleasent parents with an excellent child, and some good parents with a very difficult child. Parents with three children, one of whom has spectrum disorders - would they have selected one for bad parenting whilst doing the job right with the other two?

I've simply pointed these factors out in case you actually believe the provocative hogwash you have written.
Where the pseudo-science is persuasive enough, and the effects are sufficiently exaggerated, schools may receive additional funding. This may motivate the enthusiasm to medicalise the behaviour.

Failing this, at least they have their excuses ready-made, when the league tables are published.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to. ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.[/p][/quote]Interestingly, you have a very good point. A child with autism can demonstrate similar "symptoms" to a badly-behaved, poorly-reared child. However, it is when you spend time with them, seeing them in a variety of moods, situations and circumstances that you recognise the difference. There are some very unpleasent parents with an excellent child, and some good parents with a very difficult child. Parents with three children, one of whom has spectrum disorders - would they have selected one for bad parenting whilst doing the job right with the other two? I've simply pointed these factors out in case you actually believe the provocative hogwash you have written.[/p][/quote]Where the pseudo-science is persuasive enough, and the effects are sufficiently exaggerated, schools may receive additional funding. This may motivate the enthusiasm to medicalise the behaviour. Failing this, at least they have their excuses ready-made, when the league tables are published. From the sidelines
  • Score: -2

12:30pm Mon 24 Mar 14

tootle says...

If the child genuinely has ADHD then, in my limited experience, there is not a lot school could do other than handcuff the child to a solid immovable mass to prevent escape or attempted escape. I am sure both school and parents want the matter resolved as speedily as possible but publicly blaming the school is not going to do anybody any good. School and parents will move mountains quicker if they are working together.
If the child genuinely has ADHD then, in my limited experience, there is not a lot school could do other than handcuff the child to a solid immovable mass to prevent escape or attempted escape. I am sure both school and parents want the matter resolved as speedily as possible but publicly blaming the school is not going to do anybody any good. School and parents will move mountains quicker if they are working together. tootle
  • Score: 11

12:49pm Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

From the sidelines wrote:
charrlee wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to.

ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.
Interestingly, you have a very good point. A child with autism can demonstrate similar "symptoms" to a badly-behaved, poorly-reared child. However, it is when you spend time with them, seeing them in a variety of moods, situations and circumstances that you recognise the difference.

There are some very unpleasent parents with an excellent child, and some good parents with a very difficult child. Parents with three children, one of whom has spectrum disorders - would they have selected one for bad parenting whilst doing the job right with the other two?

I've simply pointed these factors out in case you actually believe the provocative hogwash you have written.
Where the pseudo-science is persuasive enough, and the effects are sufficiently exaggerated, schools may receive additional funding. This may motivate the enthusiasm to medicalise the behaviour.

Failing this, at least they have their excuses ready-made, when the league tables are published.
You are stealing my forum style ! Get your own personality !
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Perhaps better parenting might have made this little boy respect authority, and he would have stayed in school when his teachers told him to. ADHD, medicalising the naughty children who are the natural product of poor parenting.[/p][/quote]Interestingly, you have a very good point. A child with autism can demonstrate similar "symptoms" to a badly-behaved, poorly-reared child. However, it is when you spend time with them, seeing them in a variety of moods, situations and circumstances that you recognise the difference. There are some very unpleasent parents with an excellent child, and some good parents with a very difficult child. Parents with three children, one of whom has spectrum disorders - would they have selected one for bad parenting whilst doing the job right with the other two? I've simply pointed these factors out in case you actually believe the provocative hogwash you have written.[/p][/quote]Where the pseudo-science is persuasive enough, and the effects are sufficiently exaggerated, schools may receive additional funding. This may motivate the enthusiasm to medicalise the behaviour. Failing this, at least they have their excuses ready-made, when the league tables are published.[/p][/quote]You are stealing my forum style ! Get your own personality ! charrlee
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Mon 24 Mar 14

EllaMaai says...

This headline is so deceiving...
He did not even go missing as his teaching assistance were with him at all times which ensured his safety. They couldn't have restrained him to prevent him walking out as that would have caused even more uproar and the mother still would have been unhappy with the way the school dealt with her child
I really think the school did their best in this situation.
Personally, I believe the boy should be sent to a school which fits and suits his needs more.
This headline is so deceiving... He did not even go missing as his teaching assistance were with him at all times which ensured his safety. They couldn't have restrained him to prevent him walking out as that would have caused even more uproar and the mother still would have been unhappy with the way the school dealt with her child I really think the school did their best in this situation. Personally, I believe the boy should be sent to a school which fits and suits his needs more. EllaMaai
  • Score: 27

2:33pm Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again :

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again in BIG LETTERS :

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THEY are the reason this boy has reached the age of 8 without a statement, which would release funding for his care.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel have not awarded a statement for this boy, so the parents must be daft, and the school and their special needs assistants hopelessly incompetent. But are they?

Well the parents do NOT look or sound daft, do they? In fact, they look and sound very loving, caring, responsible parents.

What about the school? Lets look at the Ofsted report (just Google Mansel Park Primary School, go to their website, and click on Ofsted Inspection Report). The summary reads :

Mansel Park Primary School
Culver Close, Millbrook, Southampton, SO16 9HZ
Inspection dates
9−10 October 2012
Overall effectiveness Previous inspection: Satisfactory 3
This inspection : Good 2
Achievement of pupils : Good 2
Quality of teaching : Good 2
Behaviour and safety of pupils : Good 2
Leadership and management : Good 2

So the parents are good, the school is good, so the problem must be :

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL ! ! !
The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again : The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again in BIG LETTERS : THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THEY are the reason this boy has reached the age of 8 without a statement, which would release funding for his care. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel have not awarded a statement for this boy, so the parents must be daft, and the school and their special needs assistants hopelessly incompetent. But are they? Well the parents do NOT look or sound daft, do they? In fact, they look and sound very loving, caring, responsible parents. What about the school? Lets look at the Ofsted report (just Google Mansel Park Primary School, go to their website, and click on Ofsted Inspection Report). The summary reads : Mansel Park Primary School Culver Close, Millbrook, Southampton, SO16 9HZ Inspection dates 9−10 October 2012 Overall effectiveness Previous inspection: Satisfactory 3 This inspection : Good 2 Achievement of pupils : Good 2 Quality of teaching : Good 2 Behaviour and safety of pupils : Good 2 Leadership and management : Good 2 So the parents are good, the school is good, so the problem must be : THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL ! ! ! charrlee
  • Score: 5

2:47pm Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Oh, and this book is a must for parents with children who have autism :

Securing Appropriate Education Provision for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Guide for Parents and Professionals by Allison Hope-West
( 2010 ) Published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Oh, and this book is a must for parents with children who have autism : Securing Appropriate Education Provision for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Guide for Parents and Professionals by Allison Hope-West ( 2010 ) [Paperback] Published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers. charrlee
  • Score: 2

3:36pm Mon 24 Mar 14

emma and family says...

At the end of the day this has happened on more than one occasion so procedures should be in place to protect the child and he should be attending a school more fit for his needs. Having a child with autism and/or ADHD is extremely hard all the parents want is to know there child is safe in the care of the school like any other parent would with or without a disability just think about that the next time you drop your child off to school can't believe so many negative comments ! Any decent responsible parent wants the best for there child there are some kids who don't even go to school and parents who couldn't care less I'm glad this family have highlighted this issue especially in today's society
At the end of the day this has happened on more than one occasion so procedures should be in place to protect the child and he should be attending a school more fit for his needs. Having a child with autism and/or ADHD is extremely hard all the parents want is to know there child is safe in the care of the school like any other parent would with or without a disability just think about that the next time you drop your child off to school can't believe so many negative comments ! Any decent responsible parent wants the best for there child there are some kids who don't even go to school and parents who couldn't care less I'm glad this family have highlighted this issue especially in today's society emma and family
  • Score: 1

4:53pm Mon 24 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

charrlee wrote:
The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again :

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again in BIG LETTERS :

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THEY are the reason this boy has reached the age of 8 without a statement, which would release funding for his care.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel have not awarded a statement for this boy, so the parents must be daft, and the school and their special needs assistants hopelessly incompetent. But are they?

Well the parents do NOT look or sound daft, do they? In fact, they look and sound very loving, caring, responsible parents.

What about the school? Lets look at the Ofsted report (just Google Mansel Park Primary School, go to their website, and click on Ofsted Inspection Report). The summary reads :

Mansel Park Primary School
Culver Close, Millbrook, Southampton, SO16 9HZ
Inspection dates
9−10 October 2012
Overall effectiveness Previous inspection: Satisfactory 3
This inspection : Good 2
Achievement of pupils : Good 2
Quality of teaching : Good 2
Behaviour and safety of pupils : Good 2
Leadership and management : Good 2

So the parents are good, the school is good, so the problem must be :

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL ! ! !
You might admit the possibility that the child has been assessed, and that no statement is required.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again : The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again in BIG LETTERS : THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THEY are the reason this boy has reached the age of 8 without a statement, which would release funding for his care. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel have not awarded a statement for this boy, so the parents must be daft, and the school and their special needs assistants hopelessly incompetent. But are they? Well the parents do NOT look or sound daft, do they? In fact, they look and sound very loving, caring, responsible parents. What about the school? Lets look at the Ofsted report (just Google Mansel Park Primary School, go to their website, and click on Ofsted Inspection Report). The summary reads : Mansel Park Primary School Culver Close, Millbrook, Southampton, SO16 9HZ Inspection dates 9−10 October 2012 Overall effectiveness Previous inspection: Satisfactory 3 This inspection : Good 2 Achievement of pupils : Good 2 Quality of teaching : Good 2 Behaviour and safety of pupils : Good 2 Leadership and management : Good 2 So the parents are good, the school is good, so the problem must be : THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL ! ! ![/p][/quote]You might admit the possibility that the child has been assessed, and that no statement is required. From the sidelines
  • Score: 2

5:44pm Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

From the sidelines wrote:
charrlee wrote:
The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again :

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again in BIG LETTERS :

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THEY are the reason this boy has reached the age of 8 without a statement, which would release funding for his care.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL.

The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel have not awarded a statement for this boy, so the parents must be daft, and the school and their special needs assistants hopelessly incompetent. But are they?

Well the parents do NOT look or sound daft, do they? In fact, they look and sound very loving, caring, responsible parents.

What about the school? Lets look at the Ofsted report (just Google Mansel Park Primary School, go to their website, and click on Ofsted Inspection Report). The summary reads :

Mansel Park Primary School
Culver Close, Millbrook, Southampton, SO16 9HZ
Inspection dates
9−10 October 2012
Overall effectiveness Previous inspection: Satisfactory 3
This inspection : Good 2
Achievement of pupils : Good 2
Quality of teaching : Good 2
Behaviour and safety of pupils : Good 2
Leadership and management : Good 2

So the parents are good, the school is good, so the problem must be :

THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL ! ! !
You might admit the possibility that the child has been assessed, and that no statement is required.
Sidelines, you really must look more closely at my specific choice of words, and then do a little joined-up thinking.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again : The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel. Here it is again in BIG LETTERS : THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THEY are the reason this boy has reached the age of 8 without a statement, which would release funding for his care. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL. The Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel have not awarded a statement for this boy, so the parents must be daft, and the school and their special needs assistants hopelessly incompetent. But are they? Well the parents do NOT look or sound daft, do they? In fact, they look and sound very loving, caring, responsible parents. What about the school? Lets look at the Ofsted report (just Google Mansel Park Primary School, go to their website, and click on Ofsted Inspection Report). The summary reads : Mansel Park Primary School Culver Close, Millbrook, Southampton, SO16 9HZ Inspection dates 9−10 October 2012 Overall effectiveness Previous inspection: Satisfactory 3 This inspection : Good 2 Achievement of pupils : Good 2 Quality of teaching : Good 2 Behaviour and safety of pupils : Good 2 Leadership and management : Good 2 So the parents are good, the school is good, so the problem must be : THE SOUTHAMPTON SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS PANEL ! ! ![/p][/quote]You might admit the possibility that the child has been assessed, and that no statement is required.[/p][/quote]Sidelines, you really must look more closely at my specific choice of words, and then do a little joined-up thinking. charrlee
  • Score: -1

6:46pm Mon 24 Mar 14

southampton liza says...

Teach your child to behave itself and NOT climb over the locked school gate..... it's locked for a reason...How is this the school's fault,
I see it as the parents fault for not teaching their child how to behave and not teaching the child about safety etc...seriously...
Teach your child to behave itself and NOT climb over the locked school gate..... it's locked for a reason...How is this the school's fault, I see it as the parents fault for not teaching their child how to behave and not teaching the child about safety etc...seriously... southampton liza
  • Score: 1

6:55pm Mon 24 Mar 14

southampton liza says...

oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately.
If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too.
I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.
oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately. If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too. I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them. southampton liza
  • Score: 1

7:18pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Kirsty666 says...

What do half of you people know?
Some of these comments are completely disgusting saying its the parents fault I assume by you all saying this you are qualified peadiatrics? No thought not, I appreciate your comments and that you assume you all know right however until you all have children with the same disorders then you will never know.
You can tell a child with any disorder to stay where they're meant to but they don't listen because they have limited concentration nor do they have any fear of danger.
What do half of you people know? Some of these comments are completely disgusting saying its the parents fault I assume by you all saying this you are qualified peadiatrics? No thought not, I appreciate your comments and that you assume you all know right however until you all have children with the same disorders then you will never know. You can tell a child with any disorder to stay where they're meant to but they don't listen because they have limited concentration nor do they have any fear of danger. Kirsty666
  • Score: 1

7:19pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Kirsty666 says...

Brite Spark wrote:
He needs a bit of discipline and hopefully this was beaten into him when his dad came home from work.
"Bend a tree when it is young"
You really need to learn how to be a parent and possibly get a new spark to brighten you up a bit
[quote][p][bold]Brite Spark[/bold] wrote: He needs a bit of discipline and hopefully this was beaten into him when his dad came home from work. "Bend a tree when it is young"[/p][/quote]You really need to learn how to be a parent and possibly get a new spark to brighten you up a bit Kirsty666
  • Score: 2

7:22pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Kirsty666 says...

southampton liza wrote:
Teach your child to behave itself and NOT climb over the locked school gate..... it's locked for a reason...How is this the school's fault,
I see it as the parents fault for not teaching their child how to behave and not teaching the child about safety etc...seriously...
just to add tis child has ADHD also and likely has no sense of danger taught by the parent or not
[quote][p][bold]southampton liza[/bold] wrote: Teach your child to behave itself and NOT climb over the locked school gate..... it's locked for a reason...How is this the school's fault, I see it as the parents fault for not teaching their child how to behave and not teaching the child about safety etc...seriously...[/p][/quote]just to add tis child has ADHD also and likely has no sense of danger taught by the parent or not Kirsty666
  • Score: 2

8:01pm Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Kirsty666 wrote:
What do half of you people know?
Some of these comments are completely disgusting saying its the parents fault I assume by you all saying this you are qualified peadiatrics? No thought not, I appreciate your comments and that you assume you all know right however until you all have children with the same disorders then you will never know.
You can tell a child with any disorder to stay where they're meant to but they don't listen because they have limited concentration nor do they have any fear of danger.
Kirsty, this is an open forum where people use nicknames, and some of them choose to use the anonymity to be callous and cruel, just because they can get away with it. There are others, like myself, who feel this is a discussion forum where you thrash out opinions no matter how sensitive the issues.

My own comments are based on my experience as a teacher (retired now), where I regularly worked with children with special needs, specifically ADHD and Aspergers.
[quote][p][bold]Kirsty666[/bold] wrote: What do half of you people know? Some of these comments are completely disgusting saying its the parents fault I assume by you all saying this you are qualified peadiatrics? No thought not, I appreciate your comments and that you assume you all know right however until you all have children with the same disorders then you will never know. You can tell a child with any disorder to stay where they're meant to but they don't listen because they have limited concentration nor do they have any fear of danger.[/p][/quote]Kirsty, this is an open forum where people use nicknames, and some of them choose to use the anonymity to be callous and cruel, just because they can get away with it. There are others, like myself, who feel this is a discussion forum where you thrash out opinions no matter how sensitive the issues. My own comments are based on my experience as a teacher (retired now), where I regularly worked with children with special needs, specifically ADHD and Aspergers. charrlee
  • Score: 1

8:09pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Kirsty666 says...

charrlee wrote:
Kirsty666 wrote:
What do half of you people know?
Some of these comments are completely disgusting saying its the parents fault I assume by you all saying this you are qualified peadiatrics? No thought not, I appreciate your comments and that you assume you all know right however until you all have children with the same disorders then you will never know.
You can tell a child with any disorder to stay where they're meant to but they don't listen because they have limited concentration nor do they have any fear of danger.
Kirsty, this is an open forum where people use nicknames, and some of them choose to use the anonymity to be callous and cruel, just because they can get away with it. There are others, like myself, who feel this is a discussion forum where you thrash out opinions no matter how sensitive the issues.

My own comments are based on my experience as a teacher (retired now), where I regularly worked with children with special needs, specifically ADHD and Aspergers.
My comments are based on my own child and I just get sick and tired of people assuming that parents can't deal with their child because there is no discipline within their household when it's not the case at all in fact its the complete opposite, as I have previously said its no sense of danger to the outside world and not much concerntration and at the same time they don't comprehend what they are doing is wrong
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kirsty666[/bold] wrote: What do half of you people know? Some of these comments are completely disgusting saying its the parents fault I assume by you all saying this you are qualified peadiatrics? No thought not, I appreciate your comments and that you assume you all know right however until you all have children with the same disorders then you will never know. You can tell a child with any disorder to stay where they're meant to but they don't listen because they have limited concentration nor do they have any fear of danger.[/p][/quote]Kirsty, this is an open forum where people use nicknames, and some of them choose to use the anonymity to be callous and cruel, just because they can get away with it. There are others, like myself, who feel this is a discussion forum where you thrash out opinions no matter how sensitive the issues. My own comments are based on my experience as a teacher (retired now), where I regularly worked with children with special needs, specifically ADHD and Aspergers.[/p][/quote]My comments are based on my own child and I just get sick and tired of people assuming that parents can't deal with their child because there is no discipline within their household when it's not the case at all in fact its the complete opposite, as I have previously said its no sense of danger to the outside world and not much concerntration and at the same time they don't comprehend what they are doing is wrong Kirsty666
  • Score: -1

8:14pm Mon 24 Mar 14

emma and family says...

southampton liza wrote:
oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately.
If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too.
I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.
If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman
[quote][p][bold]southampton liza[/bold] wrote: oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately. If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too. I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.[/p][/quote]If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman emma and family
  • Score: -3

8:29pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Kirsty666 says...

emma and family wrote:
southampton liza wrote:
oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately.
If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too.
I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.
If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman
Well said Emma, tragically though I think its a waste of time trying to get through to people who don't understand parents or not children with disorders are a complete different ball game....
[quote][p][bold]emma and family[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton liza[/bold] wrote: oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately. If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too. I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.[/p][/quote]If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman[/p][/quote]Well said Emma, tragically though I think its a waste of time trying to get through to people who don't understand parents or not children with disorders are a complete different ball game.... Kirsty666
  • Score: -2

9:20pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Dai Rear says...

robbutler1984 wrote:
Dai Rear wrote:
When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.
I wasn't expecting to see someone say they went to school in a village in Buckinghamshire in the Daily Echo! But I went to school in Wendover too, I managed to escape once and made it half way home I think I got to about RAF Halton before I got caught. Was trying to get to Aston Clinton.

But I have had situations like this as a teaching assistant, it is a very difficult situation because you can't really grab them to stop them so if your words don't work then they'll just keep going. Luckily the times i've done it the child usually just stayed fairly close to the school.
Aston Clinton was where I lived. But I had to cycle to Weston Turville and then Mrs Andrews or Mrs Spearpoint took us to Wendover. You may very well have been at the same school. But you could be younger. Do you remember Andrew Anderson being kicked by the horse or my friend, the Polish airman's son, Richard Stanzyck?
As to the debate. I'm sure most of us could say we had "issues". I've a bad back (maybe because I insist on riding a cheap and 'orrible bicycle quite a long way each day, at 66) and I've also a lot of whistling in the ears. But so far as it goes I'm a really mobile (if deaf and daft) old person and am tremendously grateful that no one said when I was young that if I wet the bed I was "ill"
[quote][p][bold]robbutler1984[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dai Rear[/bold] wrote: When I was 8 I was in school at Wendover and we could go where we pleased at lunchtime. They were apparently very dangerous times because most families still had guns, souvenirs from the war, but then none of us had ABCD-it hadn't been invented, so perhaps that helped us when we exchanged insults and clods of earth with the driver of the Puffing Billy on the branch line to RAF Halton. Come to think of it we hadn't teaching assistants and the teachers had a good smoke at lunch time. We must have been very deprived, though we didn't feel it.[/p][/quote]I wasn't expecting to see someone say they went to school in a village in Buckinghamshire in the Daily Echo! But I went to school in Wendover too, I managed to escape once and made it half way home I think I got to about RAF Halton before I got caught. Was trying to get to Aston Clinton. But I have had situations like this as a teaching assistant, it is a very difficult situation because you can't really grab them to stop them so if your words don't work then they'll just keep going. Luckily the times i've done it the child usually just stayed fairly close to the school.[/p][/quote]Aston Clinton was where I lived. But I had to cycle to Weston Turville and then Mrs Andrews or Mrs Spearpoint took us to Wendover. You may very well have been at the same school. But you could be younger. Do you remember Andrew Anderson being kicked by the horse or my friend, the Polish airman's son, Richard Stanzyck? As to the debate. I'm sure most of us could say we had "issues". I've a bad back (maybe because I insist on riding a cheap and 'orrible bicycle quite a long way each day, at 66) and I've also a lot of whistling in the ears. But so far as it goes I'm a really mobile (if deaf and daft) old person and am tremendously grateful that no one said when I was young that if I wet the bed I was "ill" Dai Rear
  • Score: -1

11:42pm Mon 24 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Isn't this getting a bit like where the topic is Multiple Sclerosis and it's debilitating impact on sufferers, and their families, and then after a while someone says, "Talking of backaches and things, you know I keep getting a little twinge in my elbow......" "Do you? Well my shoulder plays up now and again, but only when it's raining...."
Isn't this getting a bit like where the topic is Multiple Sclerosis and it's debilitating impact on sufferers, and their families, and then after a while someone says, "Talking of backaches and things, you know I keep getting a little twinge in my elbow......" "Do you? Well my shoulder plays up now and again, but only when it's raining...." charrlee
  • Score: 1

9:56am Tue 25 Mar 14

notableedingheart says...

emma and family wrote:
At the end of the day this has happened on more than one occasion so procedures should be in place to protect the child and he should be attending a school more fit for his needs. Having a child with autism and/or ADHD is extremely hard all the parents want is to know there child is safe in the care of the school like any other parent would with or without a disability just think about that the next time you drop your child off to school can't believe so many negative comments ! Any decent responsible parent wants the best for there child there are some kids who don't even go to school and parents who couldn't care less I'm glad this family have highlighted this issue especially in today's society
Pease advise what procedures you think are appropriate and practical? Don't just throw out the usual refrains without making constructive suggestions. Perhaps another angle is "why should the majority of kids be disadvantaged by the "integration" of kids with serious ``psychological problems?"
Yes it is hard having a child with psych problems - that is undeniable. However, the world does not bend over to suit your needs to the detriment of the vast majority. And spare a thought for the suffering Teachers and Assistants who are expected to educate and manage such children within the mainstream of a school designed for the vast majority of kids rather than kids with psychological problems.
The problem is one of resources and Educational Authorities who are trying to be everything to every person and adhere to the fantasy that political correctness will make everything correct or at east cover their butts.
Sorry that pc world is not the real word - resources are scarce and dwindling. There is only so much that can be done and ultimately it must be the majority who benefit and sadly but given realities the minorities will not receive the same resources. This reality probably will not affect the minorities who generally will not achieve despite whatever resources are poured in their direction but at least the majority will benefit.
[quote][p][bold]emma and family[/bold] wrote: At the end of the day this has happened on more than one occasion so procedures should be in place to protect the child and he should be attending a school more fit for his needs. Having a child with autism and/or ADHD is extremely hard all the parents want is to know there child is safe in the care of the school like any other parent would with or without a disability just think about that the next time you drop your child off to school can't believe so many negative comments ! Any decent responsible parent wants the best for there child there are some kids who don't even go to school and parents who couldn't care less I'm glad this family have highlighted this issue especially in today's society[/p][/quote]Pease advise what procedures you think are appropriate and practical? Don't just throw out the usual refrains without making constructive suggestions. Perhaps another angle is "why should the majority of kids be disadvantaged by the "integration" of kids with serious ``psychological problems?" Yes it is hard having a child with psych problems - that is undeniable. However, the world does not bend over to suit your needs to the detriment of the vast majority. And spare a thought for the suffering Teachers and Assistants who are expected to educate and manage such children within the mainstream of a school designed for the vast majority of kids rather than kids with psychological problems. The problem is one of resources and Educational Authorities who are trying to be everything to every person and adhere to the fantasy that political correctness will make everything correct or at east cover their butts. Sorry that pc world is not the real word - resources are scarce and dwindling. There is only so much that can be done and ultimately it must be the majority who benefit and sadly but given realities the minorities will not receive the same resources. This reality probably will not affect the minorities who generally will not achieve despite whatever resources are poured in their direction but at least the majority will benefit. notableedingheart
  • Score: 3

6:07pm Tue 25 Mar 14

LucieLocket says...

"AN eight-year-old boy managed to escape from school – and walk nearly a mile home on his own."

Really?

"Panicked Kelly spent ten minutes driving around the estate before finding him on top of a garage in the close – with the two school staff nearby. " - he doesn't sound like he was on his own.

“Zack left the school building and climbed a school gate to exit the school grounds.

“At all times his support assistants were present and tried repeatedly to talk him down and calm the situation.

“After Zack escaped the grounds our staff were in constant contact with the school and kept watch over him as he made his way home."

The LSAs in question sound like they did a fantastic job under in what I can only imagine must have been a stressful and worrying situation. They and the school should be praised for keeping the child safe - in particular I'm shocked that the parents aren't more grateful that they kept him safe. Short of pinning him to the ground, what were their options?

Having said that, perhaps the whole idea is to generate interest in his case and shame the Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel?

Either way the school and staff deserve more credit and respect from all concerned.
"AN eight-year-old boy managed to escape from school – and walk nearly a mile home on his own." Really? "Panicked Kelly spent ten minutes driving around the estate before finding him on top of a garage in the close – with the two school staff nearby. " - he doesn't sound like he was on his own. “Zack left the school building and climbed a school gate to exit the school grounds. “At all times his support assistants were present and tried repeatedly to talk him down and calm the situation. “After Zack escaped the grounds our staff were in constant contact with the school and kept watch over him as he made his way home." The LSAs in question sound like they did a fantastic job under in what I can only imagine must have been a stressful and worrying situation. They and the school should be praised for keeping the child safe - in particular I'm shocked that the parents aren't more grateful that they kept him safe. Short of pinning him to the ground, what were their options? Having said that, perhaps the whole idea is to generate interest in his case and shame the Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel? Either way the school and staff deserve more credit and respect from all concerned. LucieLocket
  • Score: 5

6:22pm Tue 25 Mar 14

southampton liza says...

Kirsty666 wrote:
southampton liza wrote:
Teach your child to behave itself and NOT climb over the locked school gate..... it's locked for a reason...How is this the school's fault,
I see it as the parents fault for not teaching their child how to behave and not teaching the child about safety etc...seriously...
just to add tis child has ADHD also and likely has no sense of danger taught by the parent or not
ADHD.....did you know that the doctor/specialist who gave ADHD a name the doctor who was the leading specialist into childrens behaviour ,research etc etc on his death bed fairly recently confessed to making it all up, he confessed that he used fake studies as he felt parents were so intent on having a reason for there children's behaviour and so adamant that it had to be a condition that he just said ADHD as that way lots of people would then try harder with there children, the doctors and health authorities went along with adhd because parents would listen to them when they said that there children were suffering from a disorder that needed to be worked on in regards to helping improve there children's behaviour and would actively get involved in helping there children and they would help more than if the doctors or health professionals said they were suffering from ADHD but if they just said they are naughty, attention seekers or just plain disobedient then parents would just deny this and argue that there is something wrong with their kids so easy option for them to make a condition up...sorry if this offends that's not my intention but you cant argue with the truth...
[quote][p][bold]Kirsty666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton liza[/bold] wrote: Teach your child to behave itself and NOT climb over the locked school gate..... it's locked for a reason...How is this the school's fault, I see it as the parents fault for not teaching their child how to behave and not teaching the child about safety etc...seriously...[/p][/quote]just to add tis child has ADHD also and likely has no sense of danger taught by the parent or not[/p][/quote]ADHD.....did you know that the doctor/specialist who gave ADHD a name the doctor who was the leading specialist into childrens behaviour ,research etc etc on his death bed fairly recently confessed to making it all up, he confessed that he used fake studies as he felt parents were so intent on having a reason for there children's behaviour and so adamant that it had to be a condition that he just said ADHD as that way lots of people would then try harder with there children, the doctors and health authorities went along with adhd because parents would listen to them when they said that there children were suffering from a disorder that needed to be worked on in regards to helping improve there children's behaviour and would actively get involved in helping there children and they would help more than if the doctors or health professionals said they were suffering from ADHD but if they just said they are naughty, attention seekers or just plain disobedient then parents would just deny this and argue that there is something wrong with their kids so easy option for them to make a condition up...sorry if this offends that's not my intention but you cant argue with the truth... southampton liza
  • Score: 0

6:24pm Tue 25 Mar 14

southampton liza says...

LucieLocket wrote:
"AN eight-year-old boy managed to escape from school – and walk nearly a mile home on his own."

Really?

"Panicked Kelly spent ten minutes driving around the estate before finding him on top of a garage in the close – with the two school staff nearby. " - he doesn't sound like he was on his own.

“Zack left the school building and climbed a school gate to exit the school grounds.

“At all times his support assistants were present and tried repeatedly to talk him down and calm the situation.

“After Zack escaped the grounds our staff were in constant contact with the school and kept watch over him as he made his way home."

The LSAs in question sound like they did a fantastic job under in what I can only imagine must have been a stressful and worrying situation. They and the school should be praised for keeping the child safe - in particular I'm shocked that the parents aren't more grateful that they kept him safe. Short of pinning him to the ground, what were their options?

Having said that, perhaps the whole idea is to generate interest in his case and shame the Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel?

Either way the school and staff deserve more credit and respect from all concerned.
Well said
[quote][p][bold]LucieLocket[/bold] wrote: "AN eight-year-old boy managed to escape from school – and walk nearly a mile home on his own." Really? "Panicked Kelly spent ten minutes driving around the estate before finding him on top of a garage in the close – with the two school staff nearby. " - he doesn't sound like he was on his own. “Zack left the school building and climbed a school gate to exit the school grounds. “At all times his support assistants were present and tried repeatedly to talk him down and calm the situation. “After Zack escaped the grounds our staff were in constant contact with the school and kept watch over him as he made his way home." The LSAs in question sound like they did a fantastic job under in what I can only imagine must have been a stressful and worrying situation. They and the school should be praised for keeping the child safe - in particular I'm shocked that the parents aren't more grateful that they kept him safe. Short of pinning him to the ground, what were their options? Having said that, perhaps the whole idea is to generate interest in his case and shame the Southampton Special Educational Needs Panel? Either way the school and staff deserve more credit and respect from all concerned.[/p][/quote]Well said southampton liza
  • Score: 2

6:37pm Tue 25 Mar 14

southampton liza says...

emma and family wrote:
southampton liza wrote:
oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately.
If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too.
I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.
If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman
I don't need to read up about it,Just a FYI I used to be a special educational needs teaching assistant in a highly well regarded school so have had personal experience in both ADHD and Autism so I think this gives me every right to comment, i personally saw lots of children of various ages and various degrees etc so yeah I think I can comment with all honesty and accuracy, many times we used to try our best to get the parents involved in improving the kids behaviours and there own understanding of issues like safety etc and I have to say we were very good at getting the children and parents to understand and improve there awareness and behaviour but I also have to admit that a lot of the time parents didn't help at all as they couldn't cope or didn't want to help as they just couldn't be bothered...sorry again harsh I know but its the truth
[quote][p][bold]emma and family[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton liza[/bold] wrote: oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately. If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too. I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.[/p][/quote]If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman[/p][/quote]I don't need to read up about it,Just a FYI I used to be a special educational needs teaching assistant in a highly well regarded school so have had personal experience in both ADHD and Autism so I think this gives me every right to comment, i personally saw lots of children of various ages and various degrees etc so yeah I think I can comment with all honesty and accuracy, many times we used to try our best to get the parents involved in improving the kids behaviours and there own understanding of issues like safety etc and I have to say we were very good at getting the children and parents to understand and improve there awareness and behaviour but I also have to admit that a lot of the time parents didn't help at all as they couldn't cope or didn't want to help as they just couldn't be bothered...sorry again harsh I know but its the truth southampton liza
  • Score: 2

11:23pm Wed 26 Mar 14

southampton liza says...

Kirsty666 wrote:
emma and family wrote:
southampton liza wrote:
oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately.
If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too.
I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.
If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman
Well said Emma, tragically though I think its a waste of time trying to get through to people who don't understand parents or not children with disorders are a complete different ball game....
ADHD.....did you know that the doctor/specialist who gave ADHD a name the doctor who was the leading specialist into childrens behaviour ,research etc etc on his death bed fairly recently confessed to making it all up, he confessed that he used fake studies as he felt parents were so intent on having a reason for there children's behaviour and so adamant that it had to be a condition that he just said ADHD as that way lots of people would then try harder with there children, the doctors and health authorities went along with adhd because parents would listen to them when they said that there children were suffering from a disorder that needed to be worked on in regards to helping improve there children's behaviour and would actively get involved in helping there children and they would help more than if the doctors or health professionals said they were suffering from ADHD but if they just said they are naughty, attention seekers or just plain disobedient then parents would just deny this and argue that there is something wrong with their kids so easy option for them to make a condition up...sorry if this offends that's not my intention but you cant argue with the truth...
oh and I don't need to read up about it, Just a FYI I used to be a special educational needs teaching assistant in a highly well regarded school so have had personal experience in both ADHD and Autism so I think this gives me every right to comment, i personally saw lots of children of various ages and various degrees etc so yeah I think I can comment with all honesty and accuracy, many times we used to try our best to get the parents involved in improving the kids behaviours and there own understanding of issues like safety etc and I have to say we were very good at getting the children and parents to understand and improve there awareness and behaviour but I also have to admit that a lot of the time parents didn't help at all as they couldn't cope or didn't want to help as they just couldn't be bothered...sorry again harsh I know but its the truth
[quote][p][bold]Kirsty666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emma and family[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southampton liza[/bold] wrote: oh and before people start ranting at me for being harsh, im not trying to do down Autism or belittle it I do understand what it is etc, but that's why its even more important for children to be taught more and more about safety etc, all I mean is that I feel sorry for schools as they are dammed if they do dammed if they don't lately. If the lock all exits while kids are in school that's wrong and parents complain, if they do then that also wrong and parents complain about that too. I want to add that im very glad the boy was ok and arrived home safely etc as must have been a very worrying time for the parents as a mother of 2 myself I can imagine how traumatic that must have been for them.[/p][/quote]If you really understood and read up on autism and ADHD you wouldn't even have wrote those vile comments you sad little woman[/p][/quote]Well said Emma, tragically though I think its a waste of time trying to get through to people who don't understand parents or not children with disorders are a complete different ball game....[/p][/quote]ADHD.....did you know that the doctor/specialist who gave ADHD a name the doctor who was the leading specialist into childrens behaviour ,research etc etc on his death bed fairly recently confessed to making it all up, he confessed that he used fake studies as he felt parents were so intent on having a reason for there children's behaviour and so adamant that it had to be a condition that he just said ADHD as that way lots of people would then try harder with there children, the doctors and health authorities went along with adhd because parents would listen to them when they said that there children were suffering from a disorder that needed to be worked on in regards to helping improve there children's behaviour and would actively get involved in helping there children and they would help more than if the doctors or health professionals said they were suffering from ADHD but if they just said they are naughty, attention seekers or just plain disobedient then parents would just deny this and argue that there is something wrong with their kids so easy option for them to make a condition up...sorry if this offends that's not my intention but you cant argue with the truth... oh and I don't need to read up about it, Just a FYI I used to be a special educational needs teaching assistant in a highly well regarded school so have had personal experience in both ADHD and Autism so I think this gives me every right to comment, i personally saw lots of children of various ages and various degrees etc so yeah I think I can comment with all honesty and accuracy, many times we used to try our best to get the parents involved in improving the kids behaviours and there own understanding of issues like safety etc and I have to say we were very good at getting the children and parents to understand and improve there awareness and behaviour but I also have to admit that a lot of the time parents didn't help at all as they couldn't cope or didn't want to help as they just couldn't be bothered...sorry again harsh I know but its the truth southampton liza
  • Score: 0

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